Fragrant white flowering shrub

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by newbieplantlover, Jun 8, 2008.

  1. newbieplantlover

    newbieplantlover Active Member

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    Location:
    Kamloops, Canada
    I stumbled upon this shrub while out for a walk in Chilliwack. It was about 8-10 feet high and covered in flowers that were VERY fragrant. I'd love to find out what this is!

    Help!
     

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  2. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Philadelphus.
     
  3. NiftyNiall

    NiftyNiall Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    coquitlam
    correct: Our native Philadelphus lewisii Lewis' mock orange; mock-orange
     
  4. newbieplantlover

    newbieplantlover Active Member

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    Thank you! I can't get over how lovely it smells!
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Assumption being that you found this growing natively. Otherwise it could be a cultivated Philadelphus species or hybrid, perhaps even persisting after a homesite has been abandoned - as is often the case with old garden roses and common lilacs. P. coronarius for instance is pretty common and can look rather similar to P. lewisii.
     
  6. newbieplantlover

    newbieplantlover Active Member

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    Yes it was growing by the side of the road in Chilliwack, very lark and healthy looking plant!
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    If you care check that it is in fact the native before adopting the exact species name. Compare flowering samples with labeled plants in nearby collections or display gardens, if possible, and read detailed descriptions at libraries or on the internet. Naturalized or escaped related species from elsewhere are easily mistaken for genuine natives when found growing outside of cultivation, assumption being that if it's growing wild it must be native. The result of this is things like Rhododendron ponticum being sold here as R. macrophyllum because someone found the exotic species growing "wild" and figured it must therefore be the native.
     
  8. fari

    fari Member

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    Thank you so much. I came across it 2 days ago and since I was trying to identify that. Thank you. Smell of it is heavenly.
     

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