Flowering Prunus all over the world

Discussion in 'Ornamental Cherries' started by AlainK, Mar 12, 2022.

  1. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    The beauty of flowering Prunus/cherry trees is such that they have been acclimated all over the world. That is where they can live of course, in a temperate zone, with some frosts in winter and enough rain during the rest of the year.

    Though this forum is based in Canada, a lot of people around the world contribute. So, why not expand our horizons ?

    ;-)

    Some Prunus are native in Europe, like Prunus pissardii :

    Pruns-LaChap_220312a.jpg prunus-pissard_220305a.jpg prunus01b_160413a.jpg

    There are of course "real" cherry trees that display wonderful flowers, like Prunus avium 'Napoleon'. Dozens of them, not to mention the wild cherries :

    prunus-avium-napo_210419a.jpg

    Others have found a place to thrive here :

    Prunus 'Accolade' :

    prunus02_140312a.jpg prunus02b_220312a.jpg prunus02b_220312b.jpg

    Prunus 'Beni-shidare' :

    Pruns-LaChap_220312b.jpg Pruns-LaChap_220312c.jpg

    Any nice photos of the local/acclimated species where you live ?...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2022
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The flowers shown in the first and second shots are too pink to be those of Prunus cerasifera 'Pissardii'.
     
  3. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Thanks a lot for making me wonder what they could be... <LOL>

    As I said, the ones in photo nr. 1 are grafted : why would they bother to graft trees that are so common over here ?

    I will attend the next meeting of the City council, and when they leave, I'll ask the person in charge of gardens and environment, but I don't think she can give me the proper answer.

    Anyway, they're nice trees, I've seen them for years and enjoyed the flowers, so, why try and name things that give you joy as long as they can enlighten youre everyday life ?...
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Preceding statement that the first picture shows grafted specimens not visible to me. Grafting of clonal flowering trees common practice, regardless of kind. In the United States at this time, pinker flowered (than 'Pissardii'), purple-leaved plums looking like the first two shots would be likely to be either 'Krauter's Vesuvius' or 'Thundercloud'. However, over there other cultivars are more prevalent.

    "
    'Pissardii'

    In spring this tree, like the type, is laden with blossom, which is of a delicate rose. Its foliage, however, is its most distinctive feature; when it first expands it is of a tender ruby-red, changing later to claret colour, finally to a dull heavy purple. Its fruits, too, are purple. This variety was first noted in Persia by M. Pissard, gardener to the Shah, and by him was sent to France in 1880, whence it rapidly spread in cultivation, and is now a very common tree. A.G.M. 1928.A number of selections from ‘Pissardii’ have been named, of which the best known in Britain is ‘Nigra’, in which the flowers are of a slightly deeper pink and the purple of the leaves also deeper and more persistent. This is of American origin. The similar ‘Woodii’ was raised at Wood’s nursery, Maresfield, E. Sussex, but apparently put into commerce by Späth’s nurseries, Berlin, in 1910. Other named clones are in commerce."


    Prunus cerasifera - Trees and Shrubs Online
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2022
  5. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Wow! Rather scary names - I almost fell into the Vesuvio in the seventies, brought some suphur stones and a shekel (!) from there.
     

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