First known case of a Japanese maple declared invasive?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Gomero, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    This is an article I came through: http://ias.biodiversity.be/species/show/119

    I believe that the Belgians are overdoing it, A. rufinerve does not have an aggressive root system and I am sure that at the next big summer drought (like in 2003) most of the trees will perish.

    Gomero
     
  2. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    In addition I believe they should be grateful it has naturalized adding some nice Fall colors to the drub, dull browns of native beeches and oaks. This fashion of demonizing any foreign plan that naturalizes in a given country reminds me of the fundamentalist ayatollahs. That fallopia japonica is a threat and should be controlled, everybody understands but putting A. rufinerve in the same basket sort of decredibilizes the whole thing.

    Gomero
     
  3. jacquot

    jacquot Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Colors, yes! This is interesting. Purely anecdotal, but I do hiking and birding in a local conservancy area, and there are Japanese maples growing in the forests, not a lot, but it is hard to imagine that someone planted them. There are not a lot, either, but a generic species palmatum is clearly visible in the woods. I'll give thought next year to exactly where in the forest they are... This is in conservancy that is surrounded by suburban development, on one side somewhat closely, another 2 more buffered by a golf course and road/estate, and the other side is open water. I think there must be 200+ acres. My feeling is that the JMs are more visible adjacent to the field area that is closest to where there is residential development, but even that must be 1/4 mile from the nearest 'yard.'
     
  4. Muggin

    Muggin New Member

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    The Japanese maple has become invasive. It has naturalized in the woodlands in my area and have grown in the wood near my house. They are also spreading in my garden. I will have to unroot them and am planning to plant native maples instead.
     
  5. Charles Philip

    Charles Philip Active Member

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    I planted Sea Buckthorn in my garden last year and have heard that many consider them to be invasive in Alberta as well. Recently took home the book "Where do Camels belong", look forward to reading it, it argues for invasive species.
     

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