Figuring out what to do with Redwood

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by vshlafman, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. vshlafman

    vshlafman Member

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    Any advice would be valued...we are moving into a home in northern california (Bay Area peninsula) and we have a 100 ft. tall Redwood in our backyard. It sits about 10' from the house in the backward and is already doing some damage to the hardscaping. I'd hate to take down such a large tree but it hangs right over our roof and I'm worried that it will continue to cause damage to the yard and one day to our foundation. we're re-landscaping now so thinking about taking it down...any thoughts? It was planted 55 years ago i'm told.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Have one or more ISA Certified Arborists look at it, assess the situation.
     
  3. growing4it

    growing4it Active Member 10 Years

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    You should check with your local government about tree removal bylaws, you might need a permit before taking it down.
     
  4. David Payne Terra Nova

    David Payne Terra Nova Active Member

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    Don't be afraid of your tree.
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Agree. Redwoods hardly ever blow down. Their roots are also less damaging than those of most broadleaf trees.
     
  6. garcan

    garcan Active Member 10 Years

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    I have a similar problem. I planted one more than 20 years ago. After an extension to the house 10 years ago, it is located about 10 ft from the addition. I built my deck around it. I have to enlarge the opening in the deck every three years or so because the tree trunk is enlarging rapidly. I have a tree service company come in to assess the need to cut it down (with extreme sadness) before its roots damage my house. He assured me that there is no need to take it down and there is no risk to the foundation. He knew of a similar tree that is more than 30 years old in another of his client.
    Because this tree has a relatively short history in North America, I am not sure how much I can rely on his assessment. Since then, I have been nervously watching the tree trunk expanding every year. I would likely have to rebuild my deck soon to accommodate the expanding roots.
     
  7. David Payne Terra Nova

    David Payne Terra Nova Active Member

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    In some places they are a protected species. They can't be cut down unless they're assessed to be an extreme hazard. Look on line for your cities tree bylaw.
     
  8. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Decking is a minor consideration; what you need to know is whether the roots will affect the house foundations or not. I'd be inclined to trust the professional who examined it, in this matter.
     
  9. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    >Because this tree has a relatively short history in North America<

    You must be talking about dawn redwood.
     
  10. garcan

    garcan Active Member 10 Years

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    Sorry, I should have been more clear that I was talking about dawn redwood.
     
  11. Zeb Haney

    Zeb Haney Member

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    Several things to consider:

    Hardscaping vs tree - What would the typical lifespan be of the hardscaping if no tree or roots ever encroached? As opposed to the potential life span of your dawn redwood. Also, it is important to remember that landscapes are dynamic, constantly changing. Even hardscapes undergo changes through settling or dare I say, earthquakes.

    Foundation - at ten feet distant, you've likely got decades before encroachment even becomes a minor concern. Especially if the house has a foundation. The roots will probably grow to the foundation and turn. If you are seriously worried about the roots, you can dig a narrow trench next to the foundation and install a root barrier. PM me and I can give you the name of a few local arborists in your area that can install or coach you on how to do this.

    That brings me to the next consideration. I hate to say it, but all certified arborists are not equal. If you are going to look for advice, hire a Board Certified Master Arborist, and someone who is also affiliated with ASCA. This combination will ensure the best possible advice on site. Again PM me me if you want a few names.
     

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