fertilizer/epsonsalts/roses

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by alkvinia kaye, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. alkvinia kaye

    alkvinia kaye Member

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    Location:
    Wittman, Az 85361 USA
    We live in Az. I tested a soil sample after hearing from a botinast from Wisconsin, that you can grow anything in az, and that the healthy soil is lacking nightrigon and acid. The test kit I purchased at home depot showed me this man was right on target. Wish I could meet him again and I dont even know his name. I fertlized my roses the end of feb.with a granular rose fertlizer that is slow realeasing and good for 3 months, and the roses are just starting to produce lots of new leafs after a winter frost bite. My new climbers are slow to give new leafs and are giving me the candlelabra look. Can I now add epson salts and how do I apply it to a large rose bed or to each climber? Our soil here is very alkuline so I have purchased miricle grow for acid loving plants. I was going to apply it by spray tommorrow. When do you apply the epson salts?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Sample your soil and have a soils lab produce an analysis before adding epsom salts or doing much more fertilizing of any other kind. Ask local Arizona Cooperative Extension Service office for assistance with this.
     
  3. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    The best way that I have found to fertilize roses is with a manure around the bottom of the plant at the drip line and "lightly" worked in. Manure could also help with bringing your ph down and have a longer lasting effect on the soil by introducing a mulch.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2008
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    You don't have to work it in. Like other shrubs, better for the roses if you don't cultivate around them and damage feeder roots.
     

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