Fast growing vine

Discussion in 'Small Space Gardening' started by cctval, Jun 4, 2004.

  1. cctval

    cctval Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    vancouver
    I am looking for a very fast growing vine to screen part of my neighbor's deck.
    Full sun, east van .... what can I get? Any ideas?

    Thanks!!!
     
  2. douglas

    douglas Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    261
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    princegeorge b.c
    Hi are you looking for something for just the summer or year round? Beans are a good choice (scarlet or blue runner and they attrack humming birds. ) or clematis.

    do you have anything to support them?

    regards Doug
     
  3. phantasmagoria

    phantasmagoria Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    How about sweet peas? They smell wonderful, and grow like crazy.
     
  4. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Either Clematis armandii ( spring flowering evergreen) or Clematis terniflora ( the 'Sweet autumn clematis') would provide an evergreen cover. Both are vigorous in our area (VANCOUVER) and hardy given the experience of the past decade.

    Another perennial vine you might consider is Polygonum aubertii , sometimes called the mile-a- minute plant, or the silver lace vine. This will cover a big area in one year and should be cut right back in late winter. It is deciduous.

    Beans and sweet peas, as suggested , or even nasturtiums are great annuals for this summer!

    You have lots of choice to improve your view!
     
  5. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,058
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Stauntonia hexaphylla is pretty rampant, though not necessarily the first year. Akebia also does a surprising amount of growing for something so delicate-looking, but again not right away. Both offer a slightly different look, given that everyone and their dog seems to have clematis.
     
  6. thomascusi

    thomascusi Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Monterey, California
    Will jasmine work for me? I have about twenty feet of newly installed latice fence
    which I would like to cover in foliage to a height of six feet.

    Tom C.
     
  7. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western Washington
    How about a Campsis, common name Trumpet vine or Hummingbird vine? It has nice flowers and attracts hummingbirds. It is not evergreen but do you really need screening for a deck in the winter? Sweet Autumn Clematis is only partially evergreen or mostly deciduous for me unlike the Clematis armandii that is truly evergreen. For people in California jasmine would work well but for the most part they are not reliably hardy here, except for winter jasmine that is deciduous, not fragrant, and not really a vine. It still is a nice plant for yellow flowers in the winter.
     
  8. thomascusi

    thomascusi Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Monterey, California
    I'm not trying to screen a deck. I need to establish a permanent display which will
    be attractive all or at least most of the year. I am refurbishing my mother-in-law's
    former home (she passed away in July) and my wife and I may either live-in or sell
    her mom's former home. The home is located in Carmel, Ca. and the back yard is
    mostly sunny, but is shaded quite a bit. The new fence which I want to cover is
    viewed from a twelve foot patio door which is off the living room/dining room. If we
    sell, I think it will be important to have a beautiful display.

    I think the trumpet vine may work, and I have had mixed results with jasmine. We
    do have a morning glory which has lasted for two years without dying back and has
    actually become a pest. It strangles nearby bushes and actually killed off some ivy.

    I would greatly appreciate and further input.

    Thank you
    Tom Cusimano
     
  9. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    865
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Coquitlam, BC
    Thomascusi,
    If you are thinking of adding value to your property, you would want to avoid any planting scheme that is perceived as being an effort to maintain. A rampant growing vine is certainly a problem in that respect. You might want to stay away from Asian wisterias, virginia creepers, English Ivy's, etc. I don't have any experience gardening in sunny and warm California - might be best if you seek local advice - ask the experts at your local nurseries, for example.

    cctval
    In Vancouver, Clematis armandii is a good choice - the glossy evergreen leaves look good all year round, and the flowers are highly fragrant. It is very vigourous but easy to control by cutting back every year after flowering. But it may not like full sun. The leaves tend to fade with excessive sun exposure. I have two of these on my property, both 6 years old. One is halfway up a 75 foot cedar. The other drapes a fence barely 6 feet by 4 feet tall.
     
  10. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western Washington
    Sorry Thomascusi, I was meant to be talking to cctval about the Trumpet vine. It can be rampant, maybe more so in California, I don't know that area well. If I lived in California I might try and grow a Lady Banks rose or a Yellow Carolina jasmine, but going to a local nursery to ask for advice is a good idea.
     
  11. stargrass

    stargrass Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    north vancouver canada
    I think a trumpet vine would be a nice choice based on location in CA. Wow! A morning glory lasting two years! I was thinking morning glory for all who need a fast climber. I may not seem too fancy in relation, but OH! how beautiful!! Plant small clusters of seeds up to three inches 10 cm apart underneith a trellis... I grew them up twigs for years creating a stunning arbour!
    I also agree with the clematis armandei as a 'local' choice for a beautiful, reletively fast growing vine. Almost oriental in look, beautiful all year around! The akibia would be nice if the space is small and tall and, when they flower, they smell like chocolate!
    Good luck with all your plans, planting and gardening fun!
     
  12. snowy

    snowy Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Vancouver
    Hops?
     

Share This Page