Fargesia nitida seeds

Discussion in 'Poaceae' started by Ron B, Jan 25, 2006.

  1. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    When are they ready? Better sown soft, as are those of maples, or left to become firm first?
     
  2. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    I have never had the privilege of collecting bamboo seeds, but just in case I do, I had looked it up a year ago. You can harvest the seed individually by hand. But it seems the best way to know that it is ripe is to allow it to fall to the ground, as they only fall when they are ripe. In order to not leave things to chance, it is recommended that a piece of cloth or a tarpaulin be placed on the ground, and the seed bearing culm be shaken. The best germination rate is when the seeds are sown fresh.
     
  3. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    I received hardened seed but only 1 out of 5 germinated - in about 24 days.
     
  4. maggiec

    maggiec Active Member

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    I have one in a pot (14" diameter but tall) and I noticed it's become a sparser over the years. Will it benefit from some root pruning or division?
     
  5. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    How big is the container? How long has it been in it? Does it's leaves wilt easily and often in the summer?

    The likelihood is that it has become pot bound. Knock the container off and examine the root ball. If there is more roots and rhizomes in the root ball than potting medium, it needs repotting. You can either repot it to a larger container, or divide it into several smaller plants. You will need an old saw to do the job. A powered reciprocating saw, like a Sawzall or Tigersaw, armed with a green blade, works great in this situation.
     
  6. maggiec

    maggiec Active Member

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    Yeah, I think it probably is a pot-bound, even though it still tolerates my forgetfulness about watering. It's been in the pot for a few years and is actually nicely behaved. I'll divide it as the potted plant size is perfect for the tall narrow spot it is sited in.

    Is this bamboo invasive at all? I was afraid to plant it into the ground.
     
  7. JCardina

    JCardina Active Member

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    It's a clumper so not that invasive.

    Even the runners are far less invasive than people make them out to be if you are the sort of gardener that takes care of their plants and doesn't let them run amok.

    Most of the north american reputation of bamboo being crazily invasive are the unfair comparison to incorrectly named "mexican bamboo" which is actually not a bamboo at all and that plant *is* very invasive. Even a runner can be controlled easily if you spend time once a year to cut around it and or mow down the shoots. It's letting them go without maintenance that causes all the trouble but you wouldn't have that problem with a fargesia.
     

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