Fagus sylvatica?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Carnby, Feb 16, 2014.

  1. Carnby

    Carnby Active Member 10 Years

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    This plant looks like Fagus sylvatica. I'm sure the genus is right but I'm dubious about the species: it could be another Fagus or a particular cultivar since I live in a zone which is drier and warmer than the typical beech range (in my region beeches usually grow above 700-800 m, although there are some woods which are lower).
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The 7-9 pairs of leaf veins makes it a better fit for Fagus orientalis (typically 7-10 pairs) than for Fagus sylvatica (typically 6-7 pairs), but this isn't a definitive character. If you can get some cupules (seed 'capsules') next autumn, that should give a better determination.
     
  3. Carnby

    Carnby Active Member 10 Years

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    Well, thanks anyway.
     
  4. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Is it your tree?

    Because if it hasn't been braced to itself, one side to the other, good chance that half that tree is going to peel-off from weather if you get wind or wind and rain.

    ...
     
  5. Carnby

    Carnby Active Member 10 Years

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    No, it's not my tree. It's a beech planted in an urban area, in my town.

    We had plenty of rain this winter and that tree is still uninjured (probably the buildings around it protect it from severe weather conditions).
     
  6. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Have to agree with MDV, that tree is at risk of splitting in the future, and the risk will slowly increase as the tree gets larger / heavier. I've seen plenty of beeches with narrow forks like this splitting, it is more prone to this than most other tree species. A quiet word to the owner to have it inspected might save lives down the line.
     
  7. SusanDunlap

    SusanDunlap Active Member

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    It is possible that the leaf margin of F. sylvatica is a bit more undulate than this sample.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Some cultivated stock, including certain named forms grown as Fagus sylvatica cultivars may belong instead to the hybrid between it and F. orientalis. Historically F. orientalis itself is pretty much not seen outside of botanic gardens and arboreta in North America, although planting asked about could perfectly well be an exception.
     
  9. Carnby

    Carnby Active Member 10 Years

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    Here they are (the tape measure is metric):
     

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  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Thanks! Unfortunately, just F. sylvatica, or perhaps the hybrid between F. sylvatica and F. orientalis. It doesn't have the 1mm-broad leaf-like bracts at the base of the cupules that F. orientalis has.
     

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