Experience with Okatsune Hedge Shears

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Tobin, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. Tobin

    Tobin Active Member

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    Battle Ground, WA, USA
    For once I have found something on which the internet is NOT flooded with opinions: experience with Okatsune HEDGE shears. My dilemma is whether I should buy short- or long-handled hedge shears.

    I'll be using these primarily for cutting back ornamental grasses and a lavender hedge row. I think long-handles will allow me to avoid bending over as much and will of course give extra leverage, but they might be a negative if I had to get in close to something to cut (what that something might be, though, I'm not sure). The short-handled ones are cheaper, but I would likely have to get down on my knees to hack off a clump of grasses anyway.

    Lastly, I've found a website with a frightfully good sale on the short-handled ones and a very good non-sale price on the long-handled ones sans-bumpers.

    If you have experience that applies to my conundrum I'd love to hear it! I have some Super Bowl pool winnings just burning a hole in my pocket. Thank you Seahawks safety. haha
     
  2. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I don't have any experience with Okatsune hedge shears, but I've been pruning a box hedge a lot using shears similar to the short-handled ones. In my case the long-handled shears would be the best choice because I'm shortening the hedge drastically and need to cut rather thick branches. However, if you are going to be cutting grasses and lavender, you don't need the extra leverage of long handles. The longer handles won't reduce bending over very much because you still have to bend over the same amount to get a horizontal cut on the top of the hedge. And you have to get lower with a long handle to make an upward cut. The short-handled shears will also be lighter and less tiring to use. My suggestion is to buy the short-handled ones and see how well they work. You can always buy the more expensive ones later, if you can see an advantage to having increased leverage.
     
  3. Tobin

    Tobin Active Member

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    That advice makes sense to me. If these are as sharp as they've been billed I shouldn't need the extra leverage...especially considering that probably the thickest thing I'll be shearing is some miscanthus clumps. Appreciate the input!
     

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