Exotic looking plant

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Carnby, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. Carnby

    Carnby Active Member 10 Years

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    I've never seen such a plant; I found it in a private garden in my town, next to a silver birch. Is it an Australian species? The plant looks exotic, with those long pinnate leaves with very narrow leaflets.
     

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  2. Axel

    Axel Active Member

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    Schinus molle, I believe.
     
  3. Carnby

    Carnby Active Member 10 Years

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    Could it be Schinus molle var. areira?
     
  4. hortiphoto

    hortiphoto Active Member 10 Years

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  5. aromanowski

    aromanowski Member

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    Hi!
    Here in Argentina we have some of this plants. They are called "pimiento rosa" or "pink pepper" and also referred to by the local name "gualeguay". They are really nice looking trees =)

    Best regards,
    Andres
     
  6. Carnby

    Carnby Active Member 10 Years

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    What's the difference between S. molle and S. molle var. areira?
     
  7. hortiphoto

    hortiphoto Active Member 10 Years

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    Schinus mollis var. areira supposedly differs slightly in the number of leaflets - usually fewer than the species - and those leaflets are coriaceous (leathery) and mucronate (fairly broad at the tip but having an extended central vein that ends in a point), whereas the species has less heavily textured leaflets that are acuminate (tapering gradually to a narrow point). Considering the natural variation in leaf shapes it would take pretty fine judgment to differentiate for sure between the two. I'm presuming there must be some other differences but I can't find them described. Nevertheless, some authorities now regard the differences as clear enough to consider Schinus mollis var. areira to be a distinct species: Schinus areira.
     

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