Euonymus Alatus - Burning Bush

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by vcallinan, Jul 4, 2008.

  1. vcallinan

    vcallinan Active Member

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    Greetings! I planted this shrublast year, so it's still a baby about 3 ft tall. It was a brigth lime green when I bought it, and has stayed so. However, everything I've read says they should have "very dark green" leaves. Apart from the colour, the shrub is very robust. It flowered and produced berries last year.

    From time to time I see other ones that are lime green, too. Is there a lighter leafed variety? Is the leaf colour an indicator of maturity? Thanks in advance. ...vc
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Sample your soil and have it tested. Shrub probably needs some nitrogen supplementation, but it might also be something else. Good idea to get a test report for your soil anyway.
     
  3. vcallinan

    vcallinan Active Member

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    Hi Ron, Burning Bush is supposed to be pH adaptable (...it's "everything" adaptable, which is probably why they're listed as a noxious weed in most rural areas).

    Our shrub is near an area that is underlaid with limestone screed, which is said to be about a 3 as ph goes. All the other plants/shrubs are their "true" colour. But, it's quite possible the screed leaches alkalinity into the soil. I'll check. Thanks.
     
  4. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    Ron is refering to a Nitrogen deficiency, unrelated to iron uptake issues in plants adapted to acidic soils. My Burning Bush is quite happy (& dark green) in limestone based clay.

    Limestone based soils will tend to be alkaline (pH above 7). A pH of 3 is very low (& very acidic), not possible in limestone based soils, and likely to kill most plants. Nevertheless, soil pH is not likely the problem, soil nutrients probably are.
     

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