Identification: Edible Mushroom?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by bpither, Sep 28, 2019.

  1. bpither

    bpither Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    White Rock, Canada
    They're all over the place where I live in White Rock BC - Sept 27 2019
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Estonia
    Looks like the Gypsy Mushroom (Cortinarius caperatus) to me. If I'm correct, then they are edible, and pretty tasty. Not as good as the Pine Bolete (Boletus pinophilus), but still worth picking up, if the site is not polluted.
    Do check alternetive ID-s also and make sure you can distinguish between any possible poisonous look-alike (in my country basically only the Destroying Angel (Amanita virosa)).
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2019
  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    It could be a deadly mistake to eat unidentified or misidentified mushrooms. There are a lot of fungi events happening now on the coast Fungi Events, why not to go there and ask an expert? If you are unable do go at the very least post your question on Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds
     
    Frog likes this.
  4. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,340
    Likes Received:
    76
    Location:
    Burnaby, Canada
    To have a better idea of the likely species, we need a more mature specimen, with photos showing the top and the gills and the gill attachment to the stem. A spore print would also be very useful. The color of the cap looks wrong for a Gypsy, but that could be due to its youth. And, yes, this thread should be moved to the appropriate forum.
     
    Frog likes this.
  5. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

    Messages:
    7,218
    Likes Received:
    404
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    Okay, okay, it's moved now. :)
     
    Frog likes this.
  6. Frog

    Frog Well-Known Member Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,549
    Likes Received:
    96
    Location:
    B.C., Canada
    Hi Folks

    Yes agree with various comments above including Sundrop's advice to bring to local event e.g. the upcoming Annual Mushroom Show.

    Your mushroom is an Agaricus: Determining which species within this genus will depend on a few characters e.g. a good look at the ring of a more mature specimen, whether it stains yellow or red or not at all, whether it smells like bandaids, almonds or not, top of cap features, colour of young/mature gills.

    :-)
    frog
     
    Sundrop likes this.
  7. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Estonia
    If this mushroom was picked up from the forest near to my home, it would 100% be the Gypsy Mushroom (Cortinarius caperatus). There are no visible properties, that hint any other species in this photo. This ID is also supported by description, that these mushrooms were all over the place. The Gypsy Mushroom is the best for consumption at that exact age of this specimen on the photo. Older specimens loose their value, I hardly pick any of them after the hat is already open and never pick any, that has aged so much, that has obtained a brownish tone.
    I see no reason to ID this mushroom at the level of Agaricus, it's definitely Cortinarius.
    I don't know, if there are any similar Cortinarius-es to C. caperatus in BC, so ask local expert about that.
    Spore prints wont help to distinguish between different Cortinarius species, it is very hard to identify the exact species by a spore print even for expert. You can use UV light to rule out toxic Cortinarius species, if there might be a toxic look-alike at your place. Toxic Cortinariuses will glow under UV light.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2019
  8. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,340
    Likes Received:
    76
    Location:
    Burnaby, Canada
    One possibility is Cortinarius alboviolaceus, which occurs in BC; but it really should be checked for a cortina and rusty-brown spores. Even then, there are other similar Cortinarius species; or it may turn out to be an Agaricus species.
     
  9. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Estonia
    Cortinarius alboviolaceus has a light violet hue, or has "cold white" tone.
    C. caperatus has tone of "warm white" to "coffee with a lots of cream".
     
  10. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Estonia
  11. Frog

    Frog Well-Known Member Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,549
    Likes Received:
    96
    Location:
    B.C., Canada
    If @bpither would be willing to post a slightly more mature fruitbody of the same species, then that will resolve the genus.
    And it will help us at least narrow down the species options.
    :-)
    frog
     
  12. bpither

    bpither Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    White Rock, Canada
    Hope this helps ...
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Estonia
    This mushroom on the last 4 pictures is not a Cortinarius. It looks like a young Shaggy parasol (Chlorophyllum rhacodes) or something similar.
    Hat surface of Cortinariuses does not fracture this way.
     
    allelopath likes this.
  14. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    Put your mushroom cap up-side down on the piece of paper. Check the spore print the next day and let us know the colour.
     
  15. bpither

    bpither Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    White Rock, Canada
    If I can find another Sundrop
     
  16. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    Do they grow in shade or more in the open?
     
  17. bpither

    bpither Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    White Rock, Canada
    In an open soccer field that was recently mowed ... after I picked it
     
  18. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,910
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    According to the info on Wikipedia Shaggy parasol (Chlorophyllum rhacodes) prefers more shade and dislikes open pastures and fields.
    It could be another point that it is, as Frog has said, some kind of Agaricus.
     
  19. Frog

    Frog Well-Known Member Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,549
    Likes Received:
    96
    Location:
    B.C., Canada
    Agree with @Sundrop - in this case spore print will be useful.
    Stature and staining etc a good match for Chlorophyllum (at least C. rhacodes) but cap features including lack of disc are not best match. Agaricus limited to those with whitish gills when young, so older specimen would be helpful. Better match for cap, less good match for stature. Staining similar in some cases. Gill attachment is more pronounced in age as well.
    If you are interested in pursuing this, an older specimen (top shot, under and full side) and a spore print would be useful :-)
    frog
     
  20. Kem

    Kem Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Metchosin, BC
    My guess would also be Agaricus. Judging from the yellow discolouration, probably a member of Section Xanthodermatei, which would mean that it was one of the inedible ones, such as Agaricus deardorffensis. The trapezoidal/marshmallow-shaped head would also suggest A. deardorffensis.
     
  21. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    30
    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    So many mushroom events ... you guys in the PNW are lucky.
     
    Frog likes this.

Share This Page