Easy Annuals for the West Coast

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by flowercents, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. flowercents

    flowercents Active Member 10 Years

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    Fraser Valley, Canada
    What annuals grow well with our rainy springs and cooler summers? I started another thread about annuals that are supposed to be easy to grow, but are not. Please share your success with annuals that are well suited to our weather.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    California poppy.
     
  3. JanetW

    JanetW Active Member

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    Pansies love cooler temps and I always have to water alot, Coleus likes lots of water and do fine as long as no frost, Aquilegia is another that likes it cooler. Janet
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hey flowercents, I wanted to get back to this thread.

    I had great success with Nicotiana sylvestris last year, although tobaccos are usually warm weather favourites. Try lobelia, pansies and violas, snapdragons, hollyhock, larkspur and other poppies. Look for cool weather annuals in catalogs, think English cottage garden.

    I have had success with cosmos, but you can't plant them too early. Petunias should also do well if planted out when it is warm enough.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 4, 2010
  5. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    Nicotiana sylvestris is a perennial which has been hardy for me for several years. Petunias do great for me, as well as the small flowered ones (Million Bells). I have to agree to California Poppy but they do re-seed a lot.
     
  6. Marsha Searle

    Marsha Searle Member

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    Cosmos but you need to stake and support them as they grow. They grow well for me in 6 hrs of sun on the coast of Vancouver Island. They grow to 6 ft high and 3 ft wide with lots of flowers all summer and fall. I plant mine in 2 rows of 12" apart in good draining soil for the backdrop in front of my deck. I add mushroom manure in early spring and mid summer. They tolerate dry conditions mid summer when I haven't time to water. Great focul point. I also grow them along the property border tied to a 4ft wire fence which effectively creates an attractive, dense privacy fence that fills in the gaps between the trees. A multi purpose annual unique to the West Coast and also totally deer tolerant. Cheers!
     
  7. flowercents

    flowercents Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks for all your ideas. I've grown some of the plants mentioned, most with good success, except for the cosmos and hollyhock. Cosmos never grow well for me and my hollyhock had rust, so I pulled it out. I will try growing poppies this year.
     
  8. nancypetty

    nancypetty Member

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    impaitions do well in shade like cool wet come in lots of colors
     
  9. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years

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    Well, maybe not strictly annuals, but as easy as:

    "Jackpot" tansy, Tanacetum
    Limnanthes (Poached Egg Flower)
    Cleome
    Marigolds!
    Those wonderful old fashioned poppies (WestCoast Seeds carries lots)
    Feverfew (I have one that has lovely golden lime green foliage...it pops up here and there on its own and is always a good accent)
    Foxglove
    Morning glories
    Nemesia
    Lavatera
    Zinnias (great for bouquets)
    Rudbeckias (bloom first year from seed)
     

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