Drought resistant, fast growing shade tree

Discussion in 'Garden Design and Plant Suggestions' started by Constance, Jul 2, 2004.

  1. Constance

    Constance Member

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    Location:
    Ladysmith, BC
    Not that I'm asking much, but I would appreciate suggestions for a fast growing shade tree that can withstand drought. The tree needs to shade the top two stories of a 3 story house. I live on a well and as you know we've had low water for 4 years. My land is very dry and rocky. The area I'm thinking of planting is on the west side of the house about 10 feet from the back of my house. The land then slopes downward for about 20 feet, so I need something with non-invasive roots. Any help appreciated.
     
  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Arbutus will take the low water but it isnt fast growing, maybe Eucalyptus species of some sort? Poplar is certainly fast growing and in iage it can take dry... Trembling aspen...just spitting out ideas here.
     
  3. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Constance,

    I wouldn't suggest you plant ANY 10' from a structure, especailly a house.

    Newt
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Gum (Eucalyptus) is a good suggestion, if you live in a suitably mild area and wouldn't mind yearround shade. One of the faster-growing of the hardiest species, such as E. archeri can be planted in fall, unless there is a hard winter could probably be expected to be rooted out and ready to grow (fast!) by spring. Most other kinds of trees will require more watering to establish, as even a gum would if planted in spring.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2007
  5. Mike N Tims Mom

    Mike N Tims Mom Member

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    Standish, Maine, USA
    Do not consider Poplar or Quaking Aspen if you require non-aggressive roots. Although tolerant of dry, rocky soils, these trees have VERY invasive roots. An established group of them about 15 feet from my driveway has sent their roots under my driveway and into the garden on the opposite side. I'm constantly having to yank and chop to keep new trees from sprouting in the garden area. -Sandi
     
  6. barterjunkie

    barterjunkie Member

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    Hi. I seem to be the new guy here on this forum. I found this forum and this thread in my search for the best and fastest growing shade tree that would survive the summers here in Tucson. When I saw that Quaking Aspens were mentioned, and their root system's aggressive behavour discussed I felt the need to share just how aggressive their root systems can be.

    There is an Aspen tree in Utah they named "Pando", in Latin meaning "to spread" as in it's root system. This tree with its root system covers 117 acres , weighs 6,615 tons, and is approx. 80,000 years old, making it the largest, the heaviest, and one of the oldest living organisms on earth. Even though Aspens are one of my most favorite trees, I don't think, as much as I would love to see a huge grove of these beautiful trees completely surrounding my house , that it would be a very good idea knowing what I know now about them .

    Anyway, Here's a great article about this big guy at Wickipedia and you folks have a Great site. barterjunkie

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pando_(tree)
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    If anything poplars and aspens are characteristic of moist fertile soils. That's how they are able to grow so fast.
     
  8. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Do you mean dry in the summer?

    You have rainy autumn to spring - yes? No?

    Is it arid like eastern Washington?

    If its just dry in summer, there are a lot of trees that you can plant if you mulch the area well.
     
  9. gerryca

    gerryca Member

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    Little Leaf Linden?
     
  10. rafin37

    rafin37 Member

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    I believe a good canditate would be the Thuja Green Giant. They grow pretty fast (about 1 1/2 feet a year), are a good screen tree for privacy and they are drout resistant.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Arborvitaes require moisture, "drought" in CT is not going to be like drought out here. USA splits down the middle into a humid eastern half with rainy summers and a mostly arid western half with pronounced summer drought lasting for months. Even in moister forested zones of Pacific Slope and upper levels of Rockies the precipitation is concentrated in winter.

    Although occurring on a range of sites native Thuja plicata (a parent of 'Green Giant') has attractive appearance, reaches full development only on moist sites. Under marginal conditions it is often quite scraggly and homely. In fact, it is a climax species in wetlands, suitable sites eventually becoming "cedar swamps" dominated by western redcedar if left undisturbed for a long enough period of time.
     
  12. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    If you're considering a Eucalyptus, my E. nitens (Shining Gum) has grown rather quickly. It's grown from an 18" seedling to 50 feet in 5 years and provides excellent shade right where we need it. Zero watering needs and your growing conditions would be quite similar to mine. Eucalyptus glaucesens is reported to be a quick grower. I've just put one in this spring. E. urnigera has grown to 25' in 3 years in my garden. There's plenty to choose from.

    Cheers, LPN.

    Eucalyptus nitens
     

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