Dragon's Blood Tree

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Todd82TA, Nov 26, 2007.

  1. Todd82TA

    Todd82TA Member

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    Hey guys,

    I was looking at some random plants online, and I found this tree, the Dragon's Blood Tree. As far as I'm concerned, it's got to be one of the coolest looking trees I think I've seen in a long time.

    Dragon's Blood Tree (Image)


    Anyway, the unfortunate thing is that it takes 10 years before it begins it's unique branch growth. I was wondering if there was any way to speed this up. If I had the most amazing soil on the entire planet, would I still have to wait 10 years? Or could I maybe cut it back to 6 years?


    Thanks!!!

    Todd (Zone 10b)
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not really, no. You could buy a mature one but it would be very expensive. The scientific name (should help find it at nurseries) is Dracaena draco; it is native to the Canary Islands and adjacent western Morocco.
     
  3. Ben Dunigan

    Ben Dunigan Member

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    The true Dragon blood tree is Dracaena cinnabari not draco that is called the dragon tree. close but not the same. cinnabari is not avalable except in seed. I too am looking for this for my conservatory
     
  4. Peperomia

    Peperomia Active Member

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    Yup you are right Ben! Dracaena draco is entirely a different plant from D. cinnbari. I have known that they grow in a dry climate. Is it true?
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Both species produce "dragon's blood"; the tree in the original poster's photo link is Dracaena draco and this is also much the more readily available species.
     

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