Dracaena and cyclamen?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by ashphaltandshade, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. ashphaltandshade

    ashphaltandshade Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East Vancouver, BC, Canada
    These two poor little plants were abandoned outside my back door without so much as a note pinned to their blanket. The one looks kinda like my Dracaena sanderiana but with broader leaves, and the other one's a cyclamen innit?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,399
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Austin, Tx
  3. ashphaltandshade

    ashphaltandshade Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East Vancouver, BC, Canada
    I was going to doubt you, as all the photos I googled of Aglaonema were of bushy plants with no stems showing, but then I found this photo of the stems. http://media.photobucket.com/image/Aglaonema modestum/slackop/SDC11666.jpg This photo of the flower also looks exactly the same. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/241463/ So, I believe you are correct, that it is an Aglaonema modestum, just a horribly neglected one. Cool! I've always wanted one, as they are good in low light (no sun comes in my window), but I have never seen one in a store. I'm sure I'll get it all bushy in no time. Thank you.
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,776
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    You'll probably be wanting to repot the Algaeonema - at least into something with proper drainage holes at the bottom. They prefer a really loose, free-draining soil; I'd reccomend about 50% bark chips, 25% peat or coir, and 25% actual soil. That's how I grow both Aglaeonema and Dieffenbachia, and they thrive.
     
  5. ashphaltandshade

    ashphaltandshade Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East Vancouver, BC, Canada
    As soon as I knew what it was, I looked online for soil mixes, and the common consensus seems to be 1/3 soil, 1/3 peat (I used coconut fibre), and 1/3 sand. So, I repotted it in that today (before reading your post), definitely getting it out of that stupid pot with no drainage holes. Why do they make those things anyway? Really. Is there ever an instance when you need a pot with no drainage holes?
     
  6. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,254
    Likes Received:
    224
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    If you were growing water lilies or duckweed or maybe algae, yeah. Otherwise no.

    I agree with your irk, a&s: pots with no drainage holes are a scourge upon the world's flora.
     

Share This Page