Double Rim Saucer Lichen

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Ken Ramos, Oct 4, 2006.

  1. Ken Ramos

    Ken Ramos Member

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    I am always looking for new specimens to add to my collection of lichens and fungi. Though some are not practical or maybe unlawful to collect, one must resort to being satisfied with only a photograph. I would like to share with you a couple of photographs of my most recent addition to my personal collection. I have identified it as being a Double Rim Saucer lichen, however, lichens are difficult to positively identify without microscopic examination of the spore structure, much the same as in the identification of the myxomycota. If my identification is in error, please inform me of the correct ID.
     

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  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Very cool! Lichens are fascinating when you take a close look at them.
     
  3. Ken Ramos

    Ken Ramos Member

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    Thank you Daniel. I wish there were an easier way to identify them. There are quite a few image galleries on the web but most lichen specimens are not photographed and then processed very well to depict their actual appearance in relation to color and detail. I am going to have to do a little searching around at the local nature store for a good publication for identification. One that I am considering is "how to know the Lichens." Though the "how to know" series publications do not completely cover every aspect of the subject(s) they present, they are still a good or valuable source of reference. I have a couple that cover the Algae and the Protozoa.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    As soon as the links database software for these forums is fixed, I'll add a few (including one of the best that I know of) ID books to the Lichens ID Books list.
     
  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Added that book link, if you'd like to check it out. The book might seem expensive, but it is oh-so-worth it if you are interested at all in lichens (plus its cost is actually subsidized, i.e., it sells for lower than what it otherwise might).
     
  6. Ken Ramos

    Ken Ramos Member

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    That is a publication that I have considered along with another. The cost is a bit high but not oppressively, I have paid much more for some publications. One can never have enough books I believe, especially if they are ones that fuel an interest, and I also consider them an investment. Thanks Daniel
     
  7. Gary Perlmutter

    Gary Perlmutter Member

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    According to Brodo et al's Lichens of North America, the Double Rim Saucer Lichen is a western species and not in NC. What you have could be the Frosty Saucer Lichen, which I have found to be quite common here in the Piedmont, just east of you. Have you looked at your specimen under a black light? The Frosty Saucer Lichen shines yellow.
     
  8. Ken Ramos

    Ken Ramos Member

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    Thanks for your reply Gary and for the correct identification to the lichen sample. No, I have not, as of yet, looked at the lichen under blacklight illumination, another small piece of equipment that I need to acquire to persue the study of lichens. The Frosty Saucer lichen was one of the ID's I had considered but going from just photographs of others identifications makes it very hard to determine what is what sometimes. I noted that you referenced "Lichens of North America," a publication of which I have on order among others. Thanks again Gary.
     
  9. Gary Perlmutter

    Gary Perlmutter Member

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    Glad I could help Ken. You might want to check out the NC state park system's natural resource inventory database (http://207.4.179.38/Checklist/find.php) for checklists and images of lichens and other organisms in our state parks.
     
  10. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    >>blacklight.
    interesting. Does this only apply to lichen, not fungi? I've never read anything about fungi and blacklight. Maybe its a secret that one only learns in post-graduate fungi studies.
     
  11. Gary Perlmutter

    Gary Perlmutter Member

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    I don't know if non-lichenized fungi are UV reactive, but I see no reason why not. One good way to find out is to take a portable blacklight out in the woods at night. I did that once and was amazed with the array of color of lichens on beech trees in my neck of the woods.
     

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