dogwood help

Discussion in 'Cornus (dogwoods)' started by monkeytreeboy15, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. monkeytreeboy15

    monkeytreeboy15 Member

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    I have a dogwood tree that looks healthy in the spring, but as the season wears on and it turns into summer its leaves begin to shrivel and turn a purplish color. There is a scar in the bark of the tree and I wonder if this might be what's causing it. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, all.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Native species Cornus nuttallii particularly prone to leaf and twig blight, stem cankers.
     
  3. Blake09

    Blake09 Active Member

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  4. monkeytreeboy15

    monkeytreeboy15 Member

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    Yeah, those pictures look like the dogwood and its scar.The description also sounds close.
    The dogwood is in a spot where a sprinkler shoots a stream of water at the trunk (about where the scar is) in the summer for about 10 or 15 minutes everyday. Could this have something to do with it?
     
  5. Blake09

    Blake09 Active Member

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    maby mold is occuring, If you don't see any mold than that cant be it "somewon might say different". when did you first see the scar?, " I wonder how it got there??
     
  6. monkeytreeboy15

    monkeytreeboy15 Member

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    I don't see any mold, but in the spring of 2007 some landscapers moved the tree with a frontloader. They also spread beauty bark around it with a shovel. I suppose either the scoop on the frontloader or the shovel could have initially caused the scar.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Native species, if that is what you have not likely to be happy with daily dousing. Grows in nature on well-drained sites where it receives only natural precipitation.

    Both C. nuttallii and eastern native C. florida subject to leaf and twig blight. In addition, as I mentioned the native is also subject to stem cankers. If the transplanting was not successful your tree may also be declining due to that. If the bad part on the trunk is mechanical injury that occurred during transplanting it should be apparent from how it looks, with raised bark around the edge etc. It should then also be apparent that the work was executed by boobs.
     

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