Identification: Do you know this plant?

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by Aber, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. Aber

    Aber Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nanaimo, Canada
    Hi everyone, ok about a 1.5 years ago I received a cutting that I just left in a jar of water all this time - it has quite a root structure now. Numerous times the water has dried up but the plant still seams healthy. I have decided that its time to plant it in some soil (one doesn't want to rush such things...lol) however I would like to know what the plant is before I do so. Also, any tips on how to take care of it? Thanks in advance!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,127
    Likes Received:
    357
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Hoya of some sort. Hoya carnosa is the most commonly grown, but there are several other species in the genus. They are drought tolerant succulents, the occasional drying out won't hurt it (overwatering is far more likely to do damage). Plant in a cactus-type soil mix, and keep it on the dryish side.
     
  3. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,626
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    They also like bright indirect light, some direct sun is ok too which will help them flower.
     
  4. newbieplantlover

    newbieplantlover Active Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kamloops, Canada
    I would not recommend cactus soil, it gets quite hard and hoyas dont like this. I grow my collection of about 35 hoyas all in a mix of orchid bark and promix. They are all thriving with this soil. They prefer a very loose chunky mix.
     
  5. Cereusly Steve

    Cereusly Steve Active Member

    Messages:
    610
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MD, USA
    If your cactus soil gets hard there is something wrong with the mix. Cactus soil is supposed to be graveley but not cement.

    Most Hoya are epiphytic and they grow best in a humusy mix that is used for epiphytic cactus and bromeliads.
     
  6. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,127
    Likes Received:
    357
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    That makes sense, thanks for the correction!
     
  7. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,626
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    I'll have to try your mix newbieplantlover. I have 15 or more hoyas, just bought a nice Hoya finlaysonii that may need a new pot when it arrives. I have been using a mix of a small amount of little soil, perlite and orchid bark shards.
     
  8. newbieplantlover

    newbieplantlover Active Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kamloops, Canada
    So far I have found my mix to work very well. I tried growing a carnosa I had in cactus mix as directed by someone on here. It quickly deteriorated so I put it back into my loose mix and its growing quite happily now. All 35 different types of hoya that I have grow in it and they all like the chunky bark bits in there.
     
  9. Chester

    Chester Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    355
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria
    Can I ask what exactly is promix? I have a few Hoyas myself and a couple of them are not doing as well as, well, not doing all that well at all (damn you Hoya curtisii I am that close to pitching your a$$ out). Also maybe where I can pick some up?
     
  10. newbieplantlover

    newbieplantlover Active Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kamloops, Canada
    Promix is basically just peat moss and perlite. Same kind of thing as sunshine mix. I add some vermiculite and orchid bark to it and make sure it wont hold together if you squeeze it when its wet. I get the HP version of Promix, which just means high porosity. You can get it at most garden supply centers like art knapps or whatever.

    Hope that helps!

    ps. I have heard that curtisii can be difficult, I have mine potted very small and keep it evenly moist. I think that most of the tiny ones like curtisii, serpens, picta etc. like to stay a little bit more moist.
     
  11. Chester

    Chester Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    355
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria
    thanks newbieplantlover.


    I do have her potted small in a very loose draining mix, but I will try this promix and amendments when I do decide to repot. If that curtisii wasn't so dang charming she'd be a goner long ago.
     
  12. Cereusly Steve

    Cereusly Steve Active Member

    Messages:
    610
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MD, USA
    You mean "Promix" isn't a mix that gets paid to play for a professional sports team?

    You learn something new every day!!!

    Go Hoyas!!!

    Promix is too much moister retaining and too dense for epiphytic plants. An Orchid mix would be much better to use. Leave out the vermiculite.

    Don't leave out the genus name whne naming a species. A species epithet alone is not a species name. Hoya curtisii is not the only species named for Curtis. There is also a Narcissus curtisii, Schefflera curtisii, Euphorbia curtisii, Alocasia curtisii, Aster curtisii, Veronica curtisii, Dracaena curtisii, Quercus curtisii, Pelargonium curtisii, etc., etc., etc. The list goes on and on.
     

Share This Page