Dierama igneum and pulcherrium

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by nrad, Sep 18, 2003.

  1. nrad

    nrad Member

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    I bought 3 dierama plants from the UBC botanical garden shop after seeing your display at the Vandusen Garden Show. I was very impressed with the plants that you had as they were flowering. In fact I went out the same day after the show and bought the plants.They were planted according to David Tarrent's instuctions to me . However, none of the plants have flowered. They grew to about 3 feet,and seem to be very healthy.They were situated on a deck in a large pot and had sun until approx. 3 p.m. when they were in shade.
    Question 1 What did I do wrong ?
    2.What do I do with the plants now and over winter?( I do not have a greenhouse).

    You gave me help previously with a yellow smoke bush, it is thriving and I thankyou for your help.
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    To answer your first question, I don't think you've done anything wrong. The Dierama on my balcony garden did the same this year - foliage grew, but no flowers. I'm fairly certain it takes a year or two before the plants establish and flower.

    As for the second question, I'm going to leave that one for someone who has experience with the plant, but I'd appreciate the advice, as well. Did you plant them in the ground or a pot?
     
  3. Joan

    Joan Active Member

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    I have just been moving some self seeded plants of dierama today. This is a South African bulb which takes about three years to get to flowering size.The plants stand close to 3 feet tall at that time.
    I am quite surprised by the root structure. The bulbs resemble gladiolus, but have thick fleshy roots, like small whitish carrots. Just looking at thore fleshy roots reminds me that this plant is vulnerable to hard frost. Temperatures of -8 or -12 Celsius ( we are Canadians ) will kill this plant if it is not in excellent drainage . Deep planting helps to protect the roots, as in the Alpine Garden at UBC Botanical Garden.
    The plants which flower vigourously in my garden are quite large , growing in sandy well drained soiul.They have thrived for the past five years, mild winters in Vancouver. But I do remember our last really cold year, 1991, when even in Victoria,which is milder than Vancouver, Dierama were killed.
    I would suggest that you watch the weather this winter. If an Arctic front approaches, take every precaution you can to keep these bulbs and their fleshy roots protected!
    Good luck!
     
  4. nrad

    nrad Member

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    Thankyou for your reply. You made me feel much better when you said you had the same problem!
    I planted mine in a very large pot.
    Someone recently suggested that I plant them in a south facing bed in the garden to over-winter them. As they are grown from corms, this might be a good suggestion. What does anyone else think?
     
  5. Joan

    Joan Active Member

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    Planting in the ground is the best option if
    1) the soil drains well
    2) the bed is sheltered from really cold winter winds
    3) the roots have a chance to establish before the weather turns cold.

    Leaving these small plants in a pot for this winter , you can move the pot under shelter, such as an overhang or eaves, and then control the watering to keep it slightly damp.
    You then also have the option of moving the pot to a warmer frost free location for a week or two if an arctic front is forecast to move in!

    I hope you have success with you 'angels' fishing rods'. It has been quite a feature in my garden for the past few years.

    Best of luck!
     

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