Did my Japanese Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

Discussion in 'Maples' started by bigjohn33, Jul 20, 2006.

  1. bigjohn33

    bigjohn33 Active Member

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  2. Rima

    Rima Active Member

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    It's more likely they just have 'sunburn', and should really be in light shade if you can manage it. They also need fast draining sandy soil, not a 'flower bed' (if that's where they might be), and shouldn't be watered until they need it - not to a schedule, but when the top layer of soil is dry - they're a little more like pine trees in that respect than perennials.
     
  3. bigjohn33

    bigjohn33 Active Member

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    thanks for the advice
    the plant is located in a mid shaded place, so i am a bit surprised if it is sunburn
    this is a sandy and fast draining soil
    can it be a "heat shock"?
    what about overfertilization? does it look like that?
    waht about a fungus?
    thanks again for your answer
    i love this forum!!
     
  4. schusch

    schusch Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    Hello.

    As regards overfertilization: if your tree is in the ground there is probably no need for fertilization - especially do not add nitrogen. Have the soil tested. I don't fertilize the maples I have planted in the ground (of course I mulch them, which counts). I only fertilize older maples in pots, but very little.

    As regards verticillium, here is a thread that might of interest.
    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=8751

    If you can take a sample of leaves to a lab - where I live the agricultural ministery provides that service for free, may be it's the same in France? (same for the soil tests)- that way you can narrow down the list of culprits...


    Schusch
     
  5. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    Luxembourg is probably a rich country ;o))
    In France not only they do not do it for free, I think they would not do it even if you wanted to pay for it, LOL

    Gomero
     
  6. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    LOL is right! I hate to imagine even asking here!

    That said if anyone knows about any such service in France, I'd love to know about it... :)

    Doesn't look like verticillium to me, though I'm certainly no expert on it. I'm guessing the "canicule" has done a job, as with so many of our plants here. Wait and hope.

    -E
     
  7. schusch

    schusch Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    Gomero :)

    but seriously... it makes sense to offer this service since it helps keep track of diseases, etc, so may be - may be - they have a similar service in France, even for a fee?

    Otherwise certain stores do it for you - I've seen the Truffaut chain offer soil tests, for instance.
    Schusch
     
  8. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    Translation: "heat wave "

    Gomero
     
  9. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    No, that is not a sign of Verticillium yet. We
    see this condition here all the time when we
    do not give the plant enough water or the plant
    cannot pump water fast enough to offset the
    leaf transpiration loss. We will see the sun
    scald on the uppermost leaves as the plant does
    what it can to protect the lower leaves from
    intense heat, direct sun and hot winds. With
    a sun scorch we will see the leaves shrivel up
    turn brown and the tips of the twigs will wilt
    and we will see some twig and perhaps even
    branch damage soon afterwards in comparison
    to a sun scald.

    Placing the tree in shade may have an effect on
    making the tree look better but there is a price
    for doing that in that the tree will not adapt to
    your conditions should you be faced with another
    similar heat wave or a more intense heat cycle
    that your trees may endure in the future. It is
    better to have the tree burn in the hot sun now
    rather than see it burn some in shade as once
    the leaves drop while in sun we will have new
    growth that will be more heat and sun resistant
    to the elements that caused these leaves to scald.

    Where you are you do not get the growth cycles
    we can get here. In our Tsuma gaki we are now
    into our fourth growth spurt. Sure, the top leaves
    look like they have been fire roasted with many
    bare twigs but we also do not have any noticeable
    twig damage and thus we have new leaves starting
    to emerge from the bare tops where the third
    growth spurt leaves were and had been severely
    sun pleached at first, then flat out scalded later, fell
    off and now we have new leaves starting to come
    back on. The tree will have new growth showing
    on the lower portions of the plant before the
    uppermost growth comes back in intense weather.

    They also need fast draining sandy soil.

    No, this information does not pertain to warm
    growing areas. Water goes right through sand
    and no matter even if we super saturate our
    container plants we will still see scalding going
    on no matter how much we water. We want water
    holding capacity in our soil mediums and sand will
    not hold water. Sand is used for aiding drainage but
    will not help much otherwise. Even a heavy clay with
    ample humus in the mix will be far superior than a
    sandy composition will be for container Maples.
    A high percentage sand in the soil mix will almost
    be a death sentence for container plants here unless
    we water the plants multiple times a day, even when
    grown under 50% shade cloth. Silt is far better to
    have as our prevalent soil in our soil medium mixes.
    Silt retains and holds moisture for a long period of
    time whereas sand will hold moisture for a very
    short time, some coarse sands will not hold water
    at all. Water holding capacity is far more important
    than fast drainage is for a Japanese Maple. As long
    as the feet are not wet all of the time and we use
    native soils that do not have a history of root rot
    causing phytophthora, like so many of the Oregon
    soils have, then we have little to worry about from
    root rotting organisms here in a warm climate. Our
    soil temperatures are too warm for most wet root
    rots to ever get established here but we can see
    some dry rot in some of our plants as a consequence
    but seldom do we ever see a dry rot on Maples but it
    can happen with plants grown in the ground, given too
    much shade and with soils that have some nutrient
    deficiencies, irregular watering practices and with
    hardened (compacted) soils that have little aeration
    due to them lacking adequate organic matter and thus
    lessening the likelihood of free flow movement of
    oxygen in their soil.

    I've mentioned before elsewhere that if we are wanting
    to plant several Maples in the ground then it is only
    prudent to learn what your soil composition is, your
    nutrient contents, percentage and composition of
    your organic matter as well as your water percolation
    rates, water holding capacity and your soil and water
    pH.

    Jim
     
  10. graftedmaplecollector

    graftedmaplecollector Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    He mentioned fertilization. Did he, and if so with what and how much.
     
  11. bigjohn33

    bigjohn33 Active Member

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    Re: Did my *** Maple catch verticillium??? bis!

    thanks again for the precious advices
    it was a really light feritilization but it also was the first time
    it is always a pleasure to read your answer with high knowledge on japanese maple
    thanks again
     

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