Deformed Japanese maple leaves

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Chucko, Jun 22, 2005.

  1. Chucko

    Chucko Member

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    Deformed Japanese maple leaves - with scan

    I hope someone can help. I have a Acer (?) Maple I got as a gift a couple of months ago. I don't think it liked the move as it dropped most of it's leaves. I repotted it, put it in a nice partally shady spot and have been giving it TLC. It's secondary set of leaves are all coming in quite nice. But...

    Almost all the leaves coming in are deformed. They almost look like something is taking chunks out of the sides of the leaves so the leaf 'fingers' are making 90 degree turns. Also some of the leaf 'fingers are rounded down, again like something is eating them.

    I don't see any bugs and there is no sign of mold or anything. Any advice?
     

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    Last edited: Jun 24, 2005
  2. Chucko

    Chucko Member

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    Really? No one has any idea at all?
     
  3. PoorOwner

    PoorOwner Active Member 10 Years

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    Any pictures? is it C shaped pieces that where "chomped" from the leaves?
    If it is, then it is probably leaf cutter bees
     
  4. Chucko

    Chucko Member

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    I'll upload some scans tomorrow morning. I should of thought of that first.

    They are nice clean edges though.
     
  5. Wanda4

    Wanda4 Member

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    Could it be a variegated variety? Like "Butterfly"? That one produces sycle-shaped leaves quit often. Smooth, curled inward & odd looking.

    Wanda
     
  6. SilverVista

    SilverVista Active Member

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    The picture you posted looks very much as though something is doing some gourmet dining when the leaves are very young and tender. I've been gone from the Central Valley too long to remember whether there were slugs or snails, but I do see quite a bit of similar damage to young leaves here in Oregon from slugs. Once the leaves have filled out and hardened off, they're no longer attractive as food. Cutter bees and adult root weevils can have a similar effect, and you wouldn't see "bugs" because they don't camp out in the branches of the tree -- just do their damage and leave again. In particular, root weevils feed at night and hide under cool, dark, damp fallen leaves or mulch during the day.
     
  7. Chucko

    Chucko Member

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    Thanks for the info. I do notice that the mature leaves are left alone. I'll just love my tree, deformed leaves and all.

    Should I maybe spray with anything, or just let it go this season?
     
  8. SilverVista

    SilverVista Active Member

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    Out comes the soap box! Never, never spray unless you know what the target is. Spraying now won't have much if any effect on root weevils. They are pretty savvy, and most often will simply pick something unsprayed to dine on. You would be better off doing some research about their life cycle and baiting or trapping. If you are able to positively identify that you have them, then breaking the life cycle by killing the larvae in the soil would be a more effective control. Google for "black vine weevil" or "strawberry root weevil". Spraying won't touch slugs or snails. Baiting or just plain picking them up does the job. Leaf-cutter bees are a mixed bag. They have become more important to pollination since so much of the honey-bee population has been decimated by mites, but they also can be a nuisance. You probably need to do some reading about them, too, and if you find that you have them, decide whether the damage they do over-balances the good. Isn't it amazing how one thing leads to three more? And all you wanted was a nice tree, not a degree in entomology!

    Susan
     
  9. Chucko

    Chucko Member

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    I think I'll just let it run its course. If it is the bees (and I have a lot with my Lime tree blooming), I'd rather not kill 'em.
     
  10. webwolf

    webwolf Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi,
    I had the exactly same leaf deformation last year. I think there are slugs or snails atacking the bud when they just open up. My season is still to come in Australia so I plan to try a few things to protect the plant before the buds open. I will keep you informed if it made a difference.
    Wolfgang
     
  11. Chucko

    Chucko Member

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    Thanks for all the advice folks! I may be overly protective of my new Maples. So many people told me that they are so tempermental, I'm babying and hand-wringing over them maybe a tad to much. But man I love these trees. Is there any tree as beautiful?
     
  12. patz

    patz New Member

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    Hi, everyone.
    I have the same issue with my Beni Maiko, but was unable to understand - should the treatment be made with fungicide or insecticide?
    Thank you all.
     

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