Deciduous tree - need help with ID

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by HigherGroundJess, Sep 18, 2014.

  1. HigherGroundJess

    HigherGroundJess Member

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    Any help with the identification of this tree would be much appreciated.
    It is a deciduous tree, currently about 10' tall.
    - zigzag branching
    - undulating leaf edge
    - alternate leaves
    - bark has horizontal lenticels and grey white spots
    Have a look at the attached photos.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Tyrlych

    Tyrlych Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Fagus sp.
     
  3. HigherGroundJess

    HigherGroundJess Member

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    I was wondering if this tree is:
    Parrotia persica?
    Corylus?
    The leaves look a lot like the Hamamelidae family….
    However, the leaves are not serrated, they are just undulate.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Parrotia, complete with characteristic partly orange fall color.
     
  5. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Tyrlych that the tree in question is a Fagus sp.

    Parrotia may be an easy guess, but the bark, trunk shape and how branches are attached to the trunk point strongly towards Fagus and contradict Parrotia.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Leaves, buds and twigs are those of Parrotia, with typical Witch Hazel Family appearance, and (particularly the last two features) not beech-like at all. Really not seeing anything about it that doesn't fit the bill, including the trunk and branches.
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Another ditto to Parrotia persica.
     
  8. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    A real shame that it is not exhibiting the typical beautiful flaking bark of Parrotia.
    I would expect to see this on a tree with such a sturdy, strong trunk. Odd.

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=p...%2FFile%3AParrotia_persica_RJB2.jpg;2580;1932

    Very soon it should start to change colour.

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=p...OYGqPNfhgMgE&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1536&bih=728

    Check it again in the winter and look for the red flowers.

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=P...ft:en-US&tbm=isch&q=Parrotia+persica++flowers
     
  9. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    And definitely NOT showing the typical long slender Fagus buds ;-)

    The leaf venation is wrong for Fagus, right for Parrotia, too.

    The tree is too young to be showing the typical flaking bark of a mature Parrotia. It will though in a few years.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Or right now, below the level at which the photo was taken. It starts with a few flakes here and there. Growth habit varies with whether a specimen was raised from seed or grown from a cutting, the stereotype low forking giant bush is the result of vegetative propagation and not the normal habit of the species.
     
  12. HigherGroundJess

    HigherGroundJess Member

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    Thanks everybody!
    I will take a closer look this fall at the bark to see if there is any tell-tale flaking. And I'll get a shot of the leaf colour too.
    Then in winter, I will see if the homeowner sees any flowers.

    I appreciate all your input, it's been fun watching the debate. Will keep you posted.
    Jessica
     
  13. HigherGroundJess

    HigherGroundJess Member

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    It is October and the leaves of this tree are turning purple and red.

    A closer look at the trunk, and there is no flaking of the bark.

    Any further thoughts about the plants ID are appreciated!
     
  14. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Parrotia persica...I agree with Ron and Michael.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/12/Parrotia-persica-foliage.JPG

    Red and purple autumn colour also fits perfectly.

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=p...OYGqPNfhgMgE&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1536&bih=728

    As mentioned before....look for the red spider like flowers in winter.

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=P...ft:en-US&tbm=isch&q=Parrotia+persica++flowers

    Quote Michael...The tree is too young to be showing the typical flaking bark of a mature Parrotia. It will though in a few years.
     
  15. HigherGroundJess

    HigherGroundJess Member

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    Hello Hort lovers!
    I have fall photos of the mystery tree. Have a look, and thanks again for the help with ID.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Nothing has changed, it is still Persian ironwood. Other examples can be seen in local collections such as Van Dusen Botanical Display Garden which as I remember it has multiple plantings.
     

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