Date and Coconut palms

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by bajasal, Dec 27, 2008.

  1. bajasal

    bajasal Member

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    Is there a date palm or coconut palm that will grow in a zone 7 like oregon?
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    No. Zone 9 at best for Date Palms, and zone 11 for Coconut Palm.
     
  3. bajasal

    bajasal Member

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    Phoenix roebelinii Date Palm harty down too zone 8 could it make it in zone 7
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    You could also go with Phoenix canariensis, hardy to zone 8a. A big, impressive tree.
     
  5. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    They're not trees, but Serenoa repens, the saw palmetto, apparently grows happily in Eugene, if my memory's correct. A silver-leaved one could be quite pretty. Also Sabal minor, a moisture-loving trunkless fan palm. And of course Trachycarpus fortunei.
     
  6. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not a chance! It is zone 10, at best marginal in the warmest parts of zone 9. To survive a severe winter in zone 7, it would have to be hardy down to around -28°C. Don't mix up average minima and extremes! Half of winters get colder-than-average temperatures.

    Again, no. To be hardy in zone 8a, it would have to be able to tolerate the occasional severe winter down to about -20°C. And it can't take anything below about -10°C, which can happen in a severe winter in much of zone 9.
     
  7. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Ah, Micheal, but I used to have one in Zone 3a, and it was fine so long as I covered it in blankets for the winter....
     
  8. bajasal

    bajasal Member

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    I have bananas and fan palms now just want something thats different that I can get some fruit off of thats why I'm looking for a date or coconut palm. Or do you know of any other palms that will make it in a zone 7 or than the fan palm?
     
  9. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  10. bajasal

    bajasal Member

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    O.K. than what Palm can I have to a zone 8? Always thought I was a zone 7.... Thanks for the info Barrie!
     
  11. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    Butia capitata has edible fruits. I never tried making jelly from my plants in Jacksonville, Florida, but they were definitely popular with grey squirrels, which buried seeds all over the place, resulting in abundant seedlings. They survived an ice storm worthy of Portland in 1989.
     
  12. castawaykev

    castawaykev Active Member

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    Is there any Palm that I can grow in Prince Edward Island? I am in Zone 5a/b. I have raised (still am) banana, and Trachycarpus fortunei indoors. I take them both outside in early june and back in in late Sept. I heard I could plant the Musa banana and just cut it down and wrap piping insulation around it to help it overwinter, plus mulch. As for the palm...mmm. Any ideas?
    Kevin
     
  13. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Depends on what type of Banana you're growing, really. You should be able to overwinter it successfully in Z5 by cutting all the leaves off, and then insulating it well, but if you're trying to grow an A'ea'e, that won't work. However, if it's a Cavendish, Orinoco, or a decorative like a Basjoo, (or any of their Dwarfs) you'll be just fine with that method.

    The reason I say "cut the leaves off" rather than "cut the stem off" is because if you take the stem back to the ground, you're never going to get fruit.

    No idea on the palm, sorry.
     
  14. castawaykev

    castawaykev Active Member

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  15. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    Going back to the Willamette valley situation...a different looking palm for you could be a jubaea, which is vaguely coconut palm looking but seriously hardy. Very pricey in Canada, but you might have a lot better deals being closer to California, where they would be grown in some quantities.

    Forget about harvesting fruit off this one, I think it would be many decades before one fruited up here(the mini-coconuts are available in food markets in their native Chile).

    Growing a palm outdoors (year-round) in PEI is, I'm quite sure, hopeless. Someone else from the east coast, USA, would probably know the furthest north people have been successful with windmill palm there. Needle palm and palmetto are the other contenders for the easterners...again, not sure how far north folks have succeeded. That long stretch of below freezing would be as much a challenge as the absolute low temps, I believe?
     
  16. dogseadepression

    dogseadepression Active Member

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    You could try either a Butia capitata or a Jubea chilensis which are both hardy to zone 7. I hope these help. Wyatt
     
  17. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    In the PNW Butia capitata is fine in zone 9a and OK in zone 8 with light protection in extreme winter conditions.
    Jubaea chilensis is about a half zone less cold tollerant and would be fine in only the best PNW coastal climates with protection during bad winters.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  18. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    You could also look at a Parajubea (Quito Palm) - these grow right up to the snowline here and in Bolivia.
     
  19. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but it would have to be under a glass enclosure for your winter season. I would construct a glass wall enclosure on your SW section of your home, ensuring proper ventilation during the scorching months of our brief summers. THe fruit may be attainable in 15 to 30 years. if at all. Unless a hybrid is developed, the plants will not respond as well in an uncontrolled artificial/ humidity variable habitat.
    I am no expert, but I have tried growing coconut and date palms and all withered after e few years...
     
  20. bajasal

    bajasal Member

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    Got some snow hardy Date Palm seeds going to give them a try (.Pheoenix robelinii)
     
  21. castawaykev

    castawaykev Active Member

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    The banana survived our winters and my zone is mixed 6a and 5b in summerside, pei. I had to bubble wrap it but that was easy. We have had little snow this year , so less protection, but it has been just below or above freezing all winter save 1 week of -20c with windchill.
     

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