Damaged bark

Discussion in 'Maples' started by pphdam, May 3, 2024.

  1. pphdam

    pphdam Well-Known Member

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    I have a Skeeter's Broom with damaged bark on one side. The tree is between 5 and 8 year old, it is healthy apart from the damaged bark. As the tree grows bigger, the damaged part may not be strong enough to support the whole tree.

    The only way to save it that I can think of is to air layer the tree, however I have not done air layering before so there is a risk of killing it. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.

    IMG_20240430_193438.jpg IMG_20240430_193235.jpg IMG_20240430_193243.jpg IMG_20240430_193251.jpg
     
  2. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    I think it can heal by itself. I would just remove the dead root, new tissue is already forming on the rootstock.
     
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  3. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    I don't think witch's broom JM's can grow on their own roots? If so then air-layering will not be an option.

    I agree with @AlainK , cut off the dead root and hope for the best. It is already healing - there is a good deal of wound wood already formed so I would imagine the original bark die-back event was a year or two ago. I have had maples that suffered similar dieback and went on to recover.

    A picture of the non-damaged side of the base would help with assessing the chances of recovery.
     
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  4. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    I'm on the same camp as Alain and M on what to do.
    'I've had the same experience with trees planted too deep by nurseries and the trunk rotting away. But with a little carefull work around the base they have survived and continue to do well.
    All is not lost P.
     
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  5. pphdam

    pphdam Well-Known Member

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    @AlainK, @maf and @Acerholic, many thanks for the suggestions. I did not know witch's broom maples could not grow on their own roots.

    The damaged bark was there for a few years already, the tree is healthy in general. I have now removed the dead root and attach more photos for assessment.

    IMG_20240504_172405.jpg IMG_20240504_172412.jpg IMG_20240504_172418.jpg IMG_20240504_172425.jpg IMG_20240504_172432.jpg IMG_20240504_172438.jpg
     
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  6. Nik

    Nik Generous Contributor

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    I do not have much experience, but if it were me, I would clean the dead wood from the wound a little more so it has an easier time to close up eventually.
     

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  7. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Hi P, it is healing and N suggestion to clean it up a bit more is a good idea. I think over the next couple of years I would add some support or place it in a non windy position to allow it time to strengthen.
    But I think it will be Ok tbh.
     
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  8. pphdam

    pphdam Well-Known Member

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    @Nik , good suggestion. Will remove them with a sharp tool tomorrow. Thanks.
    P
     
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  9. pphdam

    pphdam Well-Known Member

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    Hi Derek, will do as suggested. Thanks.
    P
     
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  10. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good luck P.
     
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  11. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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    I'm showing these photos as encouragement . . . first 2 are Acer palmatum 'Waterfall' in 2019 and the last one as it looks today.

    I didn't see when I bought it that it had been planted too deep in the pot.

    Acer 'Waterfall' #2.JPG Acer 'Waterfall' #3.JPG Acer 'Waterfall' 2024.JPG
     
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  12. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    The other thing with witch's broom JM's is that very often the scion overgrows the rootstock and it makes the plant look unbalanced; too thin and weak in the section between the graft union and the soil level. @pphdam I think this is one of the factors making your Skeeter's Broom look weak in the rootstock and making you feel concerned about it.

    I will put some pictures of the lower stems of a few brooms in my garden for comparison. I notice my Pixie has some old bark damage at the base but seems none the worse for wear. The last two pictures are a maple broom that I have owned for over 20 years and is most likely Shaina, although I bought it without a label. It seems they never grow out of this habit.

    IMG_20240504_183444.jpg IMG_20240504_183622.jpg IMG_20240504_201219.jpg IMG_20240504_202903.jpg
     
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  13. pphdam

    pphdam Well-Known Member

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    @Margot and @maf, thanks for the info and sharing your photos. I am glad I didn't try to air layer my Skeeter's broom. I will take good care of it.
    P
     
  14. Zack222

    Zack222 New Member

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    Would this damage be considered partial graft failure?
     
  15. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    I don't think it is related to the graft as such. I see it more as a consequence of where a root has died, some pathogen such as bad bacteria has got in to the necrotic root tissue and spread into the bark on the lower trunk before the maple has been able to compartmentalise it.
     
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  16. dicky5ash

    dicky5ash Generous Contributor

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    This looks to be the same issue..the plant (Aoyagi) appears perfectly well..I may use a drill with a grinding head to remove a bit of the white dead wood that will allow it to continue to heel over.
     

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  17. pphdam

    pphdam Well-Known Member

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    Very nice tree. Indeed very similar to mine, do you mind to tell me how tall and roughly how old it is? Thanks.
     
  18. dicky5ash

    dicky5ash Generous Contributor

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    I’ve had it about 10/12 years - it’s probably 1.5m..probably need to repot it
     
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  19. pphdam

    pphdam Well-Known Member

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    @dicky5ash thanks, I hope my Skeeter's broom can live that long.
     
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