Identification: Cup fungi? from Himalayas

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by alok, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. alok

    alok Member

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    Hi everyone,
    Found some small cup fungi yesterday.. not sure what it is.. but trust you guys might have an idea..
    Growing below Cedar forests.. the ground seemed to be black (forest fire few years back) and they are not bigger than 4mm in diameter.
    Thanks
    Alok
     

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  2. alok

    alok Member

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    Re: himalayan Cup fungi?

    Hi everyone....
    What should I look for observation in this fungi the next time I go for the mushroom hunt??
     
  3. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Greetings Alok,

    Macroscopic characters I note when looking at cup fungi include:

    - quality of the cup "rim", such as smooth, serrated, scalloped.
    - any qualities of the inner & exterior surfaces, such as smooth, bumpy, colour, contrasting colour, pruinose (floury bloom)
    - stem or no stem
    - habitat, particularly whether it is on a burn site or not, but also whether on soil, on fresh to well-rotted wood, on buried wood, on dung, etc.
    - smell, eg. Geopyxis characteristic burned smell

    But for a more complete list, I suggest reviewing a Key to cup fungi, any region, noting any commonly referenced characters for this group.

    I've not spent much time working on cup fungi identifications, but I suspect you would need microscopy to get some of them to species.

    Hope that is helpful,
    cheers,
    frog
     
  4. alok

    alok Member

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    Thanks a lot Frog,
    will look out on the weekend for these points...
    Alok
     
  5. alok

    alok Member

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    Hi Everyone,
    Ugh..!! After spending the whole day I couldn't find any trace of this fungi that I found last saturday... Maybe its too dry and they disappeared faster instead I found this.... (Attachment) But on the basis of my Photos and the study of the area where it was growing I think it could be Tarzetta cupularis/catinus

    Ref:
    http://www.mushroomexpert.com/tarzetta_cupularis.html
    http://www.grzyby.pl/gatunki/Tarzetta_cupularis.htm
    http://www.rogersmushrooms.com/gallery/DisplayBlock~bid~6833.asp

    The ground around the growing area seemed to be burned in a previous forest fire, The forests are predominantly Coniferous and as seen in the earlier photo it is growing on the ground where there is moss growth too. The size as I had seen earlier was not bigger than 4-5mm at that time.. the shape was cup like with a very small stump for root the edges of the cup were irregular and the color was creamish-yellow

    Alok
     

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  6. alok

    alok Member

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    Hi friends,
    Went foraying in the woods again and although I had no hope but luck favoured me and I found the cup fungi again.. (this time got the photograph through a magnifying glass) and as you can see a much clearer picture..
    Also analyzed the cup on site and found that the cups brim is kind of toothed..
    the ground this time did not seem burnt (it was a different place) but was under the conifer forests on mossy patches..
    size was 7mm and although I am no expert but I'd bet my money that this is a 'tarzetta' and almost convinced that it is 'cupularis' (since it is so small) or a variation of that.. If anyone has any further knowledge about this.. please let me know.. :)
    Thanks for bearing up and I AM learning a lot with you guys..
    Alok
     

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  7. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Your Tarzetta identification makes sense to me: If I saw that in my region, I would guess Tarzetta cupularis.

    Again, I'm hesitating because I don't feel I know enough about cup fungi or the Himalayas - I'm hoping someone else will weigh in on this.

    Do please keep sending photos of these interesting things you are finding!

    frog
     
  8. alok

    alok Member

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    Thanks for your kind support Frog in fact that has been one of my reasons for constantly posting on this forum... You're a great help :)
    Alok
    PS: there's another query coming up (besides lycoperdon).. I hope you'd be able to help me on that too.. :)

     

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