Cryptomeria Japonica "Black Dragon" turning brown...

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by stubbbz, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. stubbbz

    stubbbz Member

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    Hello, I am new at landscaping and also new to the plant/tree/shrub world. One of the new plants I planted is a Cryptomeria Japonica(Black Dragon). After about 5 days of it being in the ground, the top area of the tree is turning brown (ends of the branches mostly). The nursery where we bought it from sent someone over to look at it, and the person said that the tree is in "shock" because it was planted to low to the ground and the bottom branches should not touch the ground at all. I followed the directions on the tag that said plant the tree with the root ball about an inch and a half above the ground, I did that. The two other trees(Japanese Maple and Blooming Cherry tree) I put in are doing fine and they were planted the same way. If it matters I used a mixture of peat moss and bonemeal in the bottom of the hole before I put the tree in. Also, I used some peat moss on top of the hole around the base of the tree. Also the tree is getting part sun. Any help would be greatly appreciated. This tree was over a hundred bucks and it would really be bad if it died. Thank You.
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    >The nursery where we bought it from sent someone over to look at it, and the person said that the tree is in "shock" because it was planted to low to the ground and the bottom branches should not touch the ground at all.<

    This is jive, with no basis in fact--unless they were trying to make a point that is not coming across here.

    The tree looks as though it has been subjected to hot, scalding sunshine, hot, dry winds or has lain against a hot surface that scorched. Another possibility is chemical injury, if you had the house treated with something after the tree was planted maybe that was it. Or maybe it happened to pick up a pathogenically caused disease, perhaps even sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum) that didn't show until now.

    After that ridiculous visit from the nursery representative, one might wonder if they know anything about handling their stock properly between receiving it from the supplier (if they are a retailer that does not do any growing themselves) and selling it. You might consider taking it back, on the assumption that it was developing the problem before you got it. After sending someone out to deflect you with bogus information the place you got it does not deserve any consideration.

    Or, you could keep it and assume it will not get worse, the rest of it growing on and being fine. Check around and inside rootball for dryness.

    In future do not amend planting holes, this is not beneficial. Do mulch, preferably with wood chips after planting.
     
  3. stubbbz

    stubbbz Member

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    Hi Ron, thanks for the reply. I'll try to clarify a few of the questions you had. I agree with you totally on that fact that the person they sent out was bullshitting us on the point that the tree was planted too low, if that was indeed true, why would that effect the top of the tree, wouldn't it effect the bottom branches that are "touching the ground"?? The tree definitely isnt getting too much sun or wind, its in a corner that is kinda protected and it only gets part sun. Also, The tree is getting plenty of water. The tree didn't touch any hot surface, and I'm pretty sure noone came by with any chemicals (but i'm gonna keep an eye for neighborhood punks now). The house was not treated with any chemical or anything. As for where we bought the tree, it was from a local nursery that is indeed a retailer. When we bought the tree the very middle of the tree had a couple little brown spots, the people there said that was normal and that we should just cut that out, so we did, but obviously the top of the tree has a serious problem. Like you said these people obviously don't know what they are talking about. I was browsing the web before and I came across that my tree might have "Red Mites" or a "Rust Needle Disease" do you think those could be possibilities? What do you mean by don't amend the planting holes?? I'm assuming you mean dont put anything in the hole including the bonemeal and peatmoss that I was told to put in the holes (by the same nursery btw). Hopefully that will not effect any of the other plants I have planted. Also we plan on covering the entire garden bed with mulch. Thanks a lot for the help.
     
  4. stubbbz

    stubbbz Member

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