Crabapple problem?

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by bijjy, Oct 7, 2008.

  1. bijjy

    bijjy Active Member

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    Ron B helped me identify this as Malus in my other thread (thanks Ron!)

    But I neglected to upload a pic of the whole tree to ask whether there is some sort of problem with it. It looks really scrawny, and lacking leaves. As soon as I saw it, I thought it should be removed. The only redeeming quality is the fruit, up close.
     

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Looks OK to me. Crabapples are generally among the first trees to lose their leaves in autumn. It may have a minor infection with apple scab (which will make the leaves fall earlier), but it is almost impossible to find a crabapple that doesn't have this.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    As with roses there are many kinds with much variation in disease susceptibility. The major foliage diseases are also similar between the two groups, although not of course entirely the same. Another similarity is that susceptibility of the same kinds of crabapples varies regionally.

    Modern gardeners aren't so interested in spraying much, resulting in disease resistant crabapples being pretty easily found in outlets now and rather often seen in plantings. As with other groups that have had quite a bit of work done to to them in North America a better selection is liable to be available here than in Britain, where references tend to feature cultivars no longer considered desirable here.
     
  4. bijjy

    bijjy Active Member

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    Ok. I will follow the following regimen:

    1. move tree to area with full sun
    2. rake up leaves bellow it
    3. move it to area where overhead watering won't dampen the leaves
    4. possibly apply sulphur and liquid copper (don't want to spray with anything non-organic)
    5. look into removing it and replacing with disease resistant variety

    Thanks!
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Determine if there is, in fact a problem and address that specific problem with recommended measures. Do not enter into a control routine without finding out what is going on first.
     

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