Identification: Could anyone help me to identify this seedling?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by potorange, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. potorange

    potorange New Member

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    Location:
    Bangkok, Thailand
    I live in Thailand and just got a maple seedling that germinated from seed but I still don't know its name yet. Could anyone help me to identify this seedling?

    Thank you in advance.
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    WA USA (Z8)
    Looks generally like something in Sec. Palmata so for, the most important member of this group being Acer palmatum. Did you get the seed in the mountains, where it could be a native species, or did it come from a planting, where another might be present?
     
  3. potorange

    potorange New Member

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    Location:
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Thank you for your reply.

    I got the seed under a tree in a hotel's garden from Korea during my trip since last year.
    I put it in a refrigerator then it has just sprouted this month, it seems growing well but unfortunately the weather is not cold enough for its foliage color and dormancy. As we know, if it can't get into the dormant mode then it will stress and might die within few years, what a poor maple :(
     
  4. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    nr Orléans, France (E.U.)
    Knowing the average yearly temperatures and climate where the original tree grows would probably help shorten the list of potential candidates in the Palmatum list ;-)

    And do you have any photos, or indications of the size of the leaves on the mother tree?...

    I mean, seedlings can evolve in many different sizes once they begin to establish: for example i sowed A. buergerianum and A. elegantulum this spring. See the difference between the two on this photo (left: A. buergerianum, right: A. Elegantulum), and with a rooted cutting of A. p. 'Phoenix' at the front.
     

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