corylus contorta (corkscrew hazelnut) propagation

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by DKelt, Mar 15, 2002.

  1. DKelt

    DKelt Member

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    I have a corylus contorta, which is planted in an area which only gets morning sun. It seems to be doing well. Our neighbor's dog made several cuttings for me last month, which I just stuck in the ground in a wild bushy area beside our house. I am hoping they will survive. However, I was wondering what the proper method is for propagating this tree, and what sun and soil conditions do they do best in?
     
  2. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

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    You may just be lucky with a cutting actually taking root, but the contorted hazel is notoriously difficult to root. For this reason, the plants available in nurseries are grafted, and thus quite expensive.

    Woody materials, such as this plant, root best from cuttings taken in autumn, treated with #3 rooting hormone and put in the ground outside. The success ratio is for this plant, but if you are lucky, the product will be very superior!

    Grafted plants always tend to sucker with straight shoots sprouting around the base. A successful cutting will not have this problem. Good luck!
     
  3. DKelt

    DKelt Member

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    Corylus Contorta

    The cuttings taken in spring have all died except one, which is in a pot. Will take your advice on autumn cuttings.
    Does the corylus contorta do best in a sunny location, or part sun/part shade? What type of soil does it do best in? Thanks for your help.
     
  4. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

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    Grow in fertile, well-drained soil in sun or partial shade; they are ideal for alkaline soils.
     
  5. allenjc41

    allenjc41 Member

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    Re: corylus contorta (corkscrew hazelnut)

    When you said "put in the ground outside", does that mean like grape scions, buried deep and then plant in the spring with one bud out of ground or completely bury the cuttings a few inches beneath the soil?
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Re: corylus contorta (corkscrew hazelnut)

    Inexpensive cutting-grown plants are available commercially, so there must be a method being used that results in some pretty good percentages.
     
  7. allenjc41

    allenjc41 Member

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    Re: corylus contorta (corkscrew hazelnut)

    Right, but since I have six standard filbert trees/bushes and have succefully grafted a corkscrew on one of them I want to produce more, but the layering of that one graft has not taken, so either I'll graft on to standard rootstock which I have, but would rather try cuttings. If there is any experience from posters having accomplished that feat. Thanks.
     
  8. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    Large quantities of cutting grown contortas are now available from one or more of the big Oregon nurseries (Meadow Lake or Heritage, maybe both). As mentioned, these really do make a superior plant as my old one (like most) is constantly suckering and needing these straight sprouts to be removed.

    I have rooted these, but the way they are done commercially is under mist with softwood cuttings. The window of opportunity is very narrow, sometime in June usually, when wood just starts to firm up. I did mine with a home-made intermittent mist line and some bottom heat...I'm really skeptical that much will happen without mist, tho can't say I've tried with a humidity dome or poly sheeting...suspect just a lot of moldy leaves going that route.

    Intermittent mist really revolutionized the propagation industry, almost magical during the softwood cutting season that we are just entering now in my area of the world.
     
  9. allenjc41

    allenjc41 Member

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    Thanks much for the tip. It's June so I'll give it a try. Do I put it in water or soil?
     
  10. allenjc41

    allenjc41 Member

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    I googled the propagation of the corkscrew filbert from soft wood with mist and came up will a lot of info. I wasn’t interested in going into business and setting up a auto mist, but just want to start a few corkscrew filberts. I’m retired, so I figured I could stand in with a hand sprayer for a moisturizing system and keep the humidity up with a plastic cover. I didn’t use sand , a starter mix or potting soil, but just took a shovel full of my best loam. This pix is after 4 days and they don’t look shriveled or dead yet. The info on several sites also indicated that the right timing could be critical so I’ll be adding 3 cuttings every few days through June.

    I took some pictures but it doesn't look like I can load them up.
     
  11. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    I know what you mean about not wanting to go into the propagation business...I went pretty big into this hobby because it made as much sense to do 1000 as 10, once a mist setup is operating. Too much for me tho, not being retired...I'll leave the fun to you for now.

    If you can keep the leaves on those corylus, they should be okay. Too much misting sometimes causes the leaves to drop, then they are toast. Also, too little mist will dry them out and kill them that way. Probably best to keep them rather shaded (intermittent mist systems allow you to keep things quite bright, for better growth/rooting generally).

    I usually rooted things in peat/perlite 1:1, but some things did better in pure washed sand (mostly conifers). Maybe try a few different media if you want to experiment more.

    Striking a few cuttings every few days is a good thought too, since it's tough for us to really know when that plant wants to root the most!
     
  12. allenjc41

    allenjc41 Member

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    It's been two months and I probably started 12 cuttings and 6 are left mostly those from the 1st week of June. I have been misting several times a day and was wondering if rooting was starting or if I should just dump the lot. I uncovered one and it looks like roots, just long bumps are starting so I transplanted all in individual 6" pots and it seems now that I can pretty much get by with just watering the soil.

    Next year I'll use a better starting mix as you indicated. I guess as slow growing as these are and I only want or have room for one I should be able to sell the rest on the street. This spring the larger potted cork screw were going for well over a $100 US and the small ones about $65. Big job hand misting and at least I see for the first couple of months someone has to be around for that. I'll find out more when the wife I both leave for a week in Boise and hopefully the neighbors can keep up with it. I also have a root bound fig tree which needs constant watering in this heat. I'll try to put up a blog that show some of my back yard in July.

    Again thanks for the tips on misting soft wood cuttings.

    http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=193772906&blogID=290296057
     

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