Colouring Roses

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by Mark Paul, Jun 30, 2008.

  1. Mark Paul

    Mark Paul Member

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    wich is the best rose to be coloured white rose, pink rose, red rose, ecc???
     
  2. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    You're talking about dying them by immersion? Or by setting them in dye-water? Or using different chemicals to induce different colours in the bloom? Or how?

    Because it depends on what you're trying to do.
     
  3. Mark Paul

    Mark Paul Member

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    i want to grow blue roses and wish to change it from the roots buy adding colouring
    which coulour is the best to do it???
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Start with lavender ones - then the change is not so far off.
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Actually, white roses would be the best as there's no background colour to conflict.

    Never heard of a dye that is taken up by the roots and transmitted to the flowers, though. Sorry, but I don't think the idea will work.
     
  6. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Start with a white rose. It's usually better to start off with a rose on a bush. "Underwater" the rose bush - allow the soil to dry up a bit. Choose a 1/2 open flower and cut it with a long stem. Recut under water and discard the first 1/2 inch of the stem. Make a small wedge shaped cut on the stem, about 1/2 inch from the bottom of the stem. Put a drop of food dye on the cut and seal (I use plumber's silicone tape). Place the stem in tepid water. The blue dye should travel up the stem and into the leaves and flowers after about 24-48 hours. (I would use gloves - blue hands are not particularly cosmetically pleasing to look at!)

    I haven't achieved any consistent result with this method, but it's the unpredictability of that makes it fun. Commercial cut flower growers cut the roses in bud, and then mature them with their stems immersed with a dye solution - they likely want to keep the chemical identity of their dye a competitive secret!
     

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