clumping kitty litter

Discussion in 'Soils, Fertilizers and Composting' started by Margaret, Mar 22, 2009.

  1. Margaret

    Margaret Active Member 10 Years

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    Sunshine Coast, B C Canada
    Is it advisable to use unused clumpable kitty in the garden? My cat has been eating fresh litter which I understand may be because of his kidney problems, (seeking minerals etc). This is apparently quite dangerous for him as it clumps just as well in his gut as in the litter tray! Anyway, I now have 100lbs of the stuff to get rid of and wonder if anyone has any ideas about adding it to my veggie or flower garden.
    Margaret
     
  2. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    you need to find out what's wrong with the cat - once the problem is resolved, i'm sure he will stop eating the litter - and then you won't have to get rid of the supply you have on hand.

    putting it in the garden is only going to give you a soggy mess when it's moist and solid chunks when it's dry.

    if you still want to get rid of it, offer it to a neighbor who has a cat or offer it on freecycle.org (go to the site to find/join the group for your city).
     
  3. TownMouse

    TownMouse Member

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    Yes, PLEASE do get the cat to a vet. If you don't, you'll never forgive yourself. Many shelters offer discounted care. Shelters and/or vets will not judge you -- no matter if you have waited a bit too long to bring the cat in. They just want to aid you and the innocent animal who relies on you _entirely_ for its pain-free existence.

    Clumping litter is concrete. Donating it to a shelter would be a tribute to your love of your own cat. But many facilites will reject open packages of anything, due to concern for contamination (they just place the safety of animals above our tender egos -- THANK GOODNESS!).

    Last resort, pour it into a container(s), insert a decorative garden item (birdhouse on a slick; whirligig, windchimes on a hook), moisten the litter, brace the inserted item until dry -- and enjoy. << I have not tried this but it seems an option.>>>
     
  4. Margaret

    Margaret Active Member 10 Years

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    Many thanks for the replies and your concern for my cat who is very special to me. Henry, the cat, has had a great many tests at the vets ($994 worth with an overnight stay) and he has, a among other age associated problems, chronic renal failure. He is comfortable and purry so I am giving him vet prescribed blood pressure meds. lots of love and am hoping for the best. The problem of the dollars involved can be truly heartbreaking.
    I am wary of giving the stuff away just incase it causes problems to other kitties but I suppose if I give it to the SPCA they could use it for cats who do not eat it.
    I guess that I thought of adding it to my garden soil as it is very sandy but perhaps I have to go back to the drawing board.
    Thanks once more.
    Margaret
     
  5. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    For what it's worth I built a whole courtyard garden on rubble and kitty litter. It worked a treat. The stuff I had was based on some sort of mineral stuff/ Looked like Mica. [Early brand kitty litter 30 years ago) I know there are more modern ones based on paper. I suspect if you can't get rid of it it would make a great compost heap layering source.

    Hope the cat is fine but also a bit of information. Purring does not always indicate happy. Some cats purr when in pain.

    Liz
     
  6. cowboy

    cowboy Active Member

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    Look on the kitty litter bag for the ingredients but I suspect that it is bentonite clay. If your soil is sandy, then this material will improve your soil. Just make sure you spread it evenly over the garden and then dig it in.
     
  7. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Donate the stuff to your local cat shelter, or try returning it to the place from whence you purchased it.
     

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