Citrus in Vancouver

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by Deneb1978, Jul 4, 2009.

  1. Deneb1978

    Deneb1978 Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi all,

    I was wondering if there exists any type of citrus or citrus hybrid which could grow in Vancouver outdoors year round other than Poncirus Trifoliata (which isn't even a true citrus) with little protection or care.
     
  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    I believe Meyer lemon has the best chance of survival albeit with protection and care. Gregn, who is a member of these forums, has expertise in this area; he grows a number of varieties outdoors.
     
  3. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    There are a number of citrus varieties that with a sheltered site and some protection can survive. Thrive may be a different story as is attaining them. "Hardy" citrus species are scarce to say the least around here.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  4. Deneb1978

    Deneb1978 Active Member 10 Years

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    That's too bad... it would be great if I could plant one and maybe have some lemon juice or make marmelade... Has anyone actually tried a citrus hybrid which has been grown outdoors in the PNW?... is it palatable?
     
  5. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I've had Meyers lemons, Changsha & Owari mandarins so far. More types this year hopefully.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  6. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Thousand of people successfully grow many types of citrus in climates much colder than Vancouver. In Vancouver, a tree growing in a protected location with good southern exposure, could be grown with just a little protection on the few winter nights that freezing temperatures in Vancouver are expected. Normally, just a string of Christmas lights placed through the tree's branches, and perhaps a cover work well.

    Millet (1,293-) Susan B. Anthony List Washington DC
     
  7. Deneb1978

    Deneb1978 Active Member 10 Years

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    Cool... sounds great. I wonder if anyone here in the PNW has grown Ichang Lemon...is it any good? .. it definitely seems like a viable long term citrus here. The German Wikipedia says its hardy down to -15C.
    Who knows maybe one day Canada could have its very own citrus industry LOL :P
     
  8. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Taken from "Hardy Citrus For The Southeast".......

    Ichang Lemon originated in China. This vigorous, spreading tree is very ornamental, resembling a grapefruit with large, wide leaves with a flared petiole. It produces clusters of large, bumpy, seedy, yellow grapefruit like fruits, which can be used like lemons. The fruit are extremely juicy with each one producing as much as a half-cup of juice. When over ripe, it tastes like a grapefruit and is quite edible with sugar. The Ichang Lemon also is very hardy, enduring temperatures down to 10F and below with no permanent damage as long as it is protected from wind. Propably available from Stan McKenzie Farms.

    Flavor: Sour grapefruit, some off flavors, fair quality.

    Millet (1,291-) Susan B Anthony List - Washington DC
     
  9. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    How about Yuzu? I've seen reports of hardy to 5*F or even 0*F. Anyone tried this? I grow a Meyers Lemon, but in a container, and it spends the winter in my sunroom.
     
  10. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I have a small Yuzu with several fruit coming on, about as big around as a dime at the moment.
    I'd imagine the cold you mention would defoliate and perhaps even produce tip die back / fruit loss etc.

    Cheers, LPN (Barrie)
     
  11. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The Yuzu is an ancient, natural hybrid that originated in Japan. In Japan it is mostly used as a rootstock for Satsumas. A Yuzu produces an upright thorny tree, very similar to a trifoliate orange. The fruit is about the size of a medium sized tangerine, and has a lemon like taste. It is very resistant to cold, and like many Citrus ichangensis hybrids, can go deciduous during cold spells with no loss to fruiting wood. When the tree is fully dormant it can tolerate temperatures as low as 10F and perhaps even lower.

    Flavor: Sour lemon, some off flavors, good quality, but extremely seedy, so not much juice per fruit.

    Millet (1,289-) Susan B Anthony List - Washington DC
     
  12. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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    Check on the thread " hardy citrus for British Columbia" I have quite a few citrus growing outside and in the ground. The best candidates for the PNW are poncirus trifoliata hybrids, and Citrus ichangensis, also called Ichang papeda hybrids.- The ichangensis is a true citrus variety but like its cousin the trifoliate orange, the fruit is grown for ornamental (and breeding) purposes only. I have two Ichang lemons and several yuzus as well as several sudachi's all of which are natural hybrids of the ichangensis. So far, my best hope for a usable citrus variety appears to be the Sudachi which is similar in size and use of a Key lime.

    Unlike other zone 8 growing areas we in the PNW do not get sustained heat required to get sufficient growth and fruit development out of our citrus, so choosing a suitable location AND variety is most critical. A white side facing wall in full sun with a glass or poly overhang is almost a must - with the ability to cover the plants with poly (and a frost cloth when it gets really cold) in the fall / winter and spring.

    Spring - to get increased temperatures and a early than otherwise growth flush and bloom period.
    Fall - to allow fruit maturation and protect from early frost.
    Winter - to prevent freezing of your hard work and to allow your supplementary heat source (ie Large Christmas lights) to be more effective. Also this will help overwinter non mature fruit which will likely be present.

    I hope this helps,

    Greg
     
  13. egardens

    egardens New Member

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    Do you have any fruits from the Yuzu? I would love to buy them if you are interested in selling a few? For your consideration, Dan
     

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