Culinary: Cinnamon: More Than Just Fragrant.

Discussion in 'Herbs for the Kitchen' started by togata57, Sep 14, 2008.

  1. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    I herewith transcribe a bit of news published in the Columbus (OH) Dispatch, 9/9/08:

    "Cinnamon soon might also be an ingredient in the wrapper around the bread as a way to keep out mold. In addition to its sweet aroma, cinnamon has long been known for its capacity to stop spoilage. Spanish researchers took advantage of that property in developing an anti-mold wrapper. In the Aug.13 issue of The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they report that, even with bread already tainted with mold, a wax paper made with 6 percent cinnamon oil inhibited the growth by 96 percent, proplonging freshness by up to 10 days. Cristina Nerin, one of the researchers at the University of Zaragoza, said a plastic containing cinnamon is in use commercially."
     
  2. Creeping Jenny

    Creeping Jenny Active Member

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    Very interesting! I wonder if cinnamon bread lasts longer then regular bread then!
     
  3. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Yeah, I was wondering the same thing! Can't say that I've noticed cinnamon bread having outstanding non-moldy qualities...but perhaps the sugar, wheat, yeast, etc. are what the mold grows upon. I will say that I've never seen mold on a cinnamon stick!

    Something I'd like to know: who's using this commercially-available cinnamon plastic?? Where d'you get it?
     
  4. Anthurium lover

    Anthurium lover Active Member

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    A lot of orchid growers use cinnamon as a make-shift fungicide, too.
     
  5. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    ....and for aroids also

    Ed
     
  6. bjo

    bjo Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi,

    How do you use the cinnamon as a herbicide with your plants? Would it be of any value in preventing damping off in seedlings or indeed in controlling fungal problems with germinating seeds?

    Ciao
    BrianO
     
  7. mylillies

    mylillies Member

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    Cinnamon also repels ants they do not like it this is interesting about the mold, I know it comes from tree bark but what kind of tree is it does any one know.
     
  8. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    True Cinnamon is Cinnamomum verum (syn. C. zeylanicum). However, a lot of the 'cinnamon' sold in shops is actually Cassia Cinnamomum aromaticum. The bark of the latter is a valuable spice in its own right, but not quite the same as Cinnamon bark.
     
  9. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    To use cinnamon as a herbicide, make up a strong infusion with a stick or two in hot water, let it cool, and pour it on the weeds. As a fungicide, it should be more dilute, and sprayed on cold.
     
  10. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Read this info in the newspaper:
    One recent study shows that consuming a quarter-teaspoon of cinnamon after meals reduces blood sugar levels by as much as 29 percent in some people. AND:
    In some studies, regularly adding cinnamon to your diet can reduce total cholesterol.
     
  11. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I don't know how many of you actually grow C. zeylanicum, but the leaves make an excellent energy-boost type stimulant when you're hiking. Just chew 'em up! Bark can be used in the same way, but it's a great deal stronger and eventually will stain the lips red. Leaves don't seem to do this.

    Down here in Ecuador, where we grow both true cinnamon and cassia, the bark is hardly every used - the leaves are favoured because it causes less damage to the tree.
     

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