Wildflowers: Chenopodium

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Andrey Zharkikh, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I could not find any Utah Chenopodium with pinnatifid leaves like this. The only species with subpinnatifid leaves, Chenopodium graveolens, is not reported in Utah and has a different inflorescence. Other species have mostly simple, occasionally shallowly lobed leaves.
    Occurs at elevation 2854 m. What is this?
     

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  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Have a look at Artemisia...
     
  3. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I did, without any success.
    Out of five Artemisia species listed for Wasatch Range, only A. ludoviciana and A. biennis may have lobed or pinnatifid leaves. Both do not match, neither flowers nor leaves. Wider search among Artemisia did not find anything either.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Oops... sorry, I initially intended to suggest Ambrosia.
     
  5. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Same story with Ambrosia. Five species to consider. Many with pinnate and double/triple pinnate leaves. The flowers, however, are very specific - more Artemisia-like, only hanging in spikes, not erect.
    Next summer, need to go there and look at it under a microscope. Hope to find a hybrid between Artemisia ludoviciana and Chenopodium album :))
     
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Don't suppose you crushed the foliage to check fragrance?
     
  7. Andrey Zharkikh

    Andrey Zharkikh Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Nop, didn't think about this at that time.
    It is a learning curve: first, you photograph various stuff without knowing what exactly is needed for identification; later you start paying attention to the key features and this helps to resolve most of species; finally, you are left with a bunch of samples that cannot be resolved until you collect ALL the alternatives, because of highly ambiguous keys.
    These particular photographs are from 2009, my first attempts.
     

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