Cedar Trees

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by krea, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. krea

    krea Member

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    We have 4 cedar trees in our front yard. We just bought the property 2 months ago and do not know how the trees have behaved in the past. The trees are likely Western Red Cedars but I'm unsure. they are 15" to 36" in diameter at their bases.

    I began removing a serious mature English Ivy infestation from them 3 days ago. Basically cutting the vines away from the base of the trees 10 ' up.

    the trees appear to all be showing more yellowing or dead branches all of a sudden and I am wondering if this has something to do with the ivy removal or if it could it be coincidental and something else. Do branches die off on a seasonal basis? Are there phases such as this which cedars go through?

    any feedback would be greatly appreciated. We do not want to lose these trees.
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  3. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Thuja plicata, commonly referred to as Western red cedars in B.C. and Pacific NW. As Michael suggests, not a true cedar. There is a natural amount of dead foliage yearly, not obvious on the trees here right now though. A pic may help to id. Could use "search" at top of page for "Thuja plicata" for more info. Or GOOGLE either name for info and images to id.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2007
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    But wrongly - it still isn't a cedar Cedrus.
     
  5. krea

    krea Member

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    Here are 3 photos showing bark, needles and appearance of lower limbs of one tree.

    Some branches are crisp and dead. Mostly on lower limbs of trees. Almost looks like a scorch or burn. Could chemicals found in lawn starter soil do this if applied at a very low rate in the area near the trees? I used a bag of lawn starter soil and seeded the area a few weeks ago.
    Or is it the ivy?

    thanks for the prompt responses...all of you.
     

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  6. krea

    krea Member

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    Looked at your photos of Pluja thicita and I believe this is exactly what the trees are.

    Missed adding the photo of the bark last reply. Here it is.
     

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  7. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Damage looks more serious than the natural dieback seen here, sorry don't know the cause. If you think it may be from chemicals , lots of watering over the root area may help dilute the chemicals. Thuja plicata has mainly surface roots. Maybe the branches are broken near the trunk or cut from removing the ivy.
     
  8. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yep, Thuja plicata. The foliage drop is as far as I can see only the interior shaded foliage; if that is so, then it isn't too serious. As long as the outer foliage in the sun remains dark green, it should be OK.
     
  9. krea

    krea Member

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    thanks for the response, I am watering right now as I now suspect another possible cause could be that chemicals introduced through our septic field (although we use very little in the way of harsh household cleaners or detergents).

    I checked the fertilizer content on the lawn soil and it was 0.08/0.03/0.02
    Hardly enough to do this to these trees, wouldn't you think? It certainly didn't burn the existing lawn which is minimal below the trees.

    You don't think it has anything to do with the ivy do you?



    hoping for a speedy recovery.....
     
  10. krea

    krea Member

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    No damage was done to the trees as the ivy was being removed and certainly no root damage. I strongly suspect chemicals either from natural or unatural source.

    I read that the ivy can release chemicals onto trees as a way to gain the upper hand. Have you ever heard of this?
     
  11. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Very dubious. Never heard of it here, where ivy is native. It only competes by shading and 'regular' root competiton for water and soil nutrients.
     

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