Cardiocrinum 'giganteum'

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by Charles Richard, Oct 12, 2008.

  1. Charles Richard

    Charles Richard Active Member 10 Years

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    I was given a cardiocrinum (4-5 yr. seedling). I understand that I will have to wait a few years for it to bloom. I have done some study on this plant, but the information I have received on this site, has always been very informative.
    The plant was in a pot and there is a bulbess form ontop the soil and the leaved merge from this. I understand that the cardiocrium is a bulb itself, but am I to assume that the bulbess part (green) is to be planted above the soil level?
    I understand that these plant do well in a woodland setting. I have read that they dislike too much sun light?
    If anyone has info on this beautiful plant, I would appreciate it.
     
  2. Cereusly Steve

    Cereusly Steve Active Member

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    Cardiocrinum giganteum is a valid species not a cultivar name. It really is the giant of the Liliaceae.

    Cardiocrinum is indeed a true bulbous genus allied to Lilium but it is a bit more touchy and is best grown as a forest understory plant, as your research as alredy pointed out.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Native to woodland clearings in mountains of southeast Asia. Rich moist soil, no wind or slugs. When it flowers the plant looks even more startling than when merely a clump of artificial-looking spade-like leaves, as the towering thick stalk and stiffly downward-pointing trumpets also look as though made of a synthetic material such as rubber.

    Flowering ends the life of that bulb but offshoots may continue on. Seeds are also likely to be left behind, do not cut the spent flowers off.

    No quotes around giganteum as it is a species name rather than a cultivar.
     
  4. levilyla

    levilyla Active Member

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    Are the leaves of this supposed to go dormant in summer? I planted one in the spring and the leaves disappeared. Hoping this is supposed to happen...or I guess I have lost it AGAIN.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    No, it shouldn't disappear during the summer. It is a monsoon climate plant, summer is the prime time for growth and that is when flowering of this species occurs. Bulbs that disappear after the spring flowering are from climates with dry summers.
     
  6. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years

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    I found some of these in bulb form yesterday at Phoenix Perennials. A tad dessicated, I soaked the bulb overnight in a weak fertilizer solution. It is about 5" long, 3" fat, and has a small green leaf budding out of the top (which is why I chose it...the bud promised success).

    I plan to start it in a pot indoors, and then plant it in a semi-shady spot in the garden and see what happens.

    Do I lift the bulb in the fall and store indoors, or are they reliably hardy here in Vancouver?

    Shall I leave it planted in its pot with the pot sides split or just plant it out in the garden...do they get fussed if you move them from pot to garden once growing?

    Advice welcome.
     
  7. Charles Richard

    Charles Richard Active Member 10 Years

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    Hello,
    I purchased my Cardiocrinum, last year in a 1gal. pot and planted it out last fall.
    Thanks to all of the excellent advice of this web site, it made finding a site for it much easier.
    You could probably leave it in the pot for a while until you are sure that it roots up well and then plant it out in the site you have chosen. While it is the pot you will be able to monitor the watering and care that it will need. Plant the green bulbous part of the plant with the leaf merging just on top of the soil level.
    I planted ours in a sheltered site, in a shaded area of our property. Tried to keep it out of any frost pockets on the property.
    I put a winter mulch around the plant and pine branches tented over it for the winter and it seems to be starting growth.
    Ron B. on this forum gave wonderful advise and his answers on this subject are worth reading.
    I want to plant some more, but wanted to wait to see if I was able to keep this one growing before spending the money. Because they are monocarpic plants, I want to have them at different ages so I can enjoy them every year or every other. Hoping that they produce offsets as well.
    Good gardening.
     
  8. levilyla

    levilyla Active Member

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    Mine disappeared last summer (newly planted just leaves) and I thought I had lost it but it has come back (just leaves). I am thrilled that it did and hope it will bloom in the next couple of years.
     

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