Identification: Can you ID this Maple?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by ichoudhury, Aug 8, 2010.

  1. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    United States
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ybcjm_FkRDA <--- I ran into this youtube video (hope its ok to link youtube here) and started to wonder what type of Japanese Maple is this. Anybody have an idea?

    Somebody called it Osakazuki but I am not quite convinced. I've guessed Seiryu but I think I'm wrong here too. The person who posted the video just did a drive by shooting, so he has no idea what variety of maple in his video.

    Thanks
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,755
    Likes Received:
    578
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Doesn't play for me, probably my security settings.
     
  3. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    United States
    Perhaps ... how about just copy and paste the URL and try that way?
     
  4. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,903
    Likes Received:
    1,266
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, England
    Definitely not 'Seiryu', would be much more upright than that.

    The video is too blurry to make out any details of leaf shape etc, but the growth habit is like that of a large and old dissectum. As to which particular one it would be very difficult, if not almost impossible, to ID from fall colour alone.

    Very nice trees though, and superb colour!
     
  5. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    United States
    Yes indeed! I'm sure it will take a long time before achieving a result such as the one in the video, but knowing the potential, I sure would like to own one (or even two) :-D
     
  6. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    United States
    Could it be Dissectum Viridis?
     
  7. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    United States
  8. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    United States
  9. JT1

    JT1 Contributor

    Messages:
    1,356
    Likes Received:
    373
    Location:
    Euclid, OH USA
    I watched the video before reading any comments, as I did not want to be influenced by any opinions. The fall color reminds me of my Viridis, but it was hard to make out the fine details due to poor video quality. Then I saw the summer video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ocva3zT_sHg&feature=watch_response

    The tree looks like it could be planted by a first generation owner of the house, so it has to be very old. That would rule out any new introductions from the early mid to late 1900's. Virdis is very old and some say it could be the first green dissectum. It is always found in very old gardens. Based on the videos and age of the tree, my guess is Acer palmatum Viridis.
     
  10. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    United States
    So you think the Tree is over 50 years old? (Possibly even 100 years old since you counting off early 1900s also) .. Well, in that case, I guess enjoying beauty such as the one in that video would be unthinkable .. sigh :( ..

    From that perspective, any of my other Japanese maple that old would look appear. Thanks for your insight.
     
  11. ichoudhury

    ichoudhury Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    United States
    Well I ended up giving up hope finding someone who may have taken some cuttings and grafted from the ones in Portland Japanese Garden. I did get in touch with a Maple guy who got me a Ornatum variety that's been growing very slowly for nearly 2 years in my backyard. Maybe over time, when it get thick and bushy, it may look similar to the ones I saw in that video :D
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page