Can anyone identify this tree?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by sgtmama, Jul 27, 2007.

  1. sgtmama

    sgtmama Member

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Marthasville, Missouri USA
    My husband and I were recently in northern California and saw this lovely tree all over the place. Most of them were just beginning to bloom. We asked several people what they were and only one even guessed. I am attaching a picture of the tree and of the flower on the tree. vacation 486.jpg

    vacation 483.jpg
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,196
    Likes Received:
    391
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Corymbia ficifolia (syn. Eucalyptus ficifolia). Native to Australia, a very popular ornamental tree in warm regions (does not tolerate more than a couple of degrees below zero).
     
  3. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,526
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Victoria Australia [cool temperate]
    Also is a bit dangerous as it likes to crack branches off when they get mature. But having said that they use them as street trees here in Melbourne. They are very beautiful and do come in a variety of colours. Also great for bees.


    Liz
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2007
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,888
    Likes Received:
    625
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    For the many readers likely to be misled by the unspecified temperature measuring system, "zero" in this instance means the freezing point, as in 32F/0C. The tree is not hardy to -2F.
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    11,196
    Likes Received:
    391
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Of course! It's the international global standard, and doesn't need that sort of explanation! No need to dredge up confusing archaic F nonsense!
     
  6. tipularia

    tipularia Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,388
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Northeast Texas USA
    The poster lives in Missouri. Like it or not, the Faheinheit scale is still commonly used in the US. Probably over 90% of US citizens can't relate to the Celsius scale. The International System of Units (SI) standard temperature scale is the Kelvin scale.
     
  7. HolderBuilt

    HolderBuilt Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta Canada
    Right on - and the common name is red or scarlet flowering gum. Holderbuilt
     
  8. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,769
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Brisbane Queensland Australia
    Exactly Liz they are beautiful however being shallow rooting trees they have a tendency to "fall over" or break off in high winds. As beautiful as they are i personally don't plant them or I cut them down (on my land) where i can for safety reasons. I had a 15 metre tree fall over about 4 years ago when we were renting and i had the music full boar and i could still hear the "crack". We were lucky it didn't hit the house or fence.

    I love to look at them in someone elses backyard ;)

    Ed
     
  9. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,526
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Victoria Australia [cool temperate]
    If you have the space like I have I have made mine as part of native plantings around my paddock edge. That way they are safe and have some support from wind with other shrubbery. The ones on the streets here seem to have been pruned tight so they don't get all the weight.
    I apologise for sending the incorrect page of pics the other day but please look at these if you are still interested "sgtmama"
    http://images.google.com.au/images?...countryAU&q=flowering+gums&btnG=Search+Images

    Liz
     
  10. sgtmama

    sgtmama Member

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Marthasville, Missouri USA
    Thanks to everyone for the information. I apreciate someone pointing out the -2 was C not F since I do live in the US! It does get confusing with some of us using different scales, but that's the way it is. :) The blooms on the tree were so beautiful I was interested in whether it would be possible to grow in Missouri. Since our temperatures frequently get quite low in the winter, it certainly would not have a chance here. Thanks again for all the help!
     

Share This Page