Can anyone identify these two maples?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by shelli, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. shelli

    shelli Active Member

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    I'm not sure if this thread belongs in "maples" or "identification" but here goes.

    Can anyone tell me which specific type of Japanese maple this is? I'd like to buy the same kind next time I go shopping. (this is my old 50-year-old maple from last year... for those of you following my sad saga.)

    This other maple popped up on its own in my yard. It's leaves are amber in the spring, turn green in the summer and are quite a bit larger than the other maples. The tree puts out new growth all summer long and even into the early fall. The leaves turn a yellow/ocre color in the fall. Not spectacularly bright (by New England standards). Does anyone know what kind it is?
     

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  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Take a foliage sample of the Japanese maple with you to the nursery to find a similar one. The second tree is the notorious Norway maple, a weed species in many States.
     
  3. shelli

    shelli Active Member

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    Hmmm, I wonder if my Crimson King dropped the seed for that tree. Isn't a Crimson King a variety of Norway maple???

    The nurseries I've been to don't know "jack" about which kind of maple is which. They're just selling trees! The JM in the picture is gone, but I do have some pressed leaves... maybe I could send them off for identification.
     
  4. Rima

    Rima Active Member

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    Google Mountain Maples and send them a picture of your 'purpurea' maple. They will tell you what it is, no question.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    What I was saying was take your samples (pressed specimens, it seems) to nurseries and compare them with Japanese maples there yourself to find similar ones. There are hundreds of kinds, you don't necessarily have to reacquire the same exact clone to get the appearance you want from the new tree. And if your original was grown from seed rather than by grafting it will not actually be possible to acquire a propagation of the same individual. Many purpleleaf Japanese maples are seedlings grown from purpleleaf trees, even today with the many fine vegetatively propagated (grafted) named selections on the market.

    If the site is infested with verticillium, has developed a drainage problem or has another unresolved issue still in effect that is responsible for the loss of the previous tree it can be expected that a replacement will experience problems as well--unless and until the limiting factor is removed.
     
  6. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    a lot of purple leaved japanese maples get sold as " acer palmatum atropurpureum" which basically means "dark purple leaved japanese maple".
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Purple leaf pigmentation is fairly strongly heritable; many seedlings from a purple leaf plant will also have at least somewhat purplish leaves. This means that (a) your Japanese Maple could easily be a seedling with no cultivar name, and (b) your Norway Maple (which looks very normal wild-type green) is unlikely to be a seedling from a 'Crimson King', more likely a seed that's blown in from a green specimen somewhere else.

    Edit: corrected typo "'Krimson Cing'" ;-)
     

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