calamondin oranges

Discussion in 'Botany Photo of the Day Submissions' started by stonegarden, May 19, 2007.

  1. stonegarden

    stonegarden Member

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    I am proud of my Calamondin Orange (Citrofortunella microcarpa) been growing it from dwarfed rootstock from Monrovia for about 7 years. beautiful aromatic white flowers, prolific fruit, no larger than 1 in. wide, acid juice, not very tasty but edible none the less. a very rewarding tiny tree for pots. about 2.5 ft. tall
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    Hi, stonegarden. I would have bought one of these trees this year if they had been in a better condition. Can you post a picture of the entire tree? I'd like to compare what I saw with one that has been growing for a few years.

    The trees at the nursery had a small head of foliage which seemed out of proportion to the rootstock which came in a 5-gal pot. Could it be that a large root system is required to support the variegated foliage that contains much yellow (and thus little chlorophyll)?

    The fruit from my unvariegated calamonin is sour as well but not nearly as much as I thought they would be. I've been eating them fresh, peel and all, and rather enjoy them. They're sour but full of flavor and the peel is quite sweet when the fruit has been on the tree for a long time.
     
  3. stonegarden

    stonegarden Member

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    Well you live a little too far north for citrus to do really well. California is ideal. they can't do well over the winter in areas where it frosts overnight. even here in Vancouver WA it is too cold. Over summer it is ok, but you have to worry about bringing them inside over winter if planted in pots. I've seen alot of failed attempts at citrus since moving here from CA.

    It must be slim pickin's for citrus in the nurseries because of the harsher winters of the north. The trees for sale are usually grafts. They use 15-25 year old rootstock so that the tree can bear fruit right away that's why the trunk seems larger than expected. look for the inevitable grafting scar on the trunk.

    I agree, sour but full of character.

    I can post a pic on Monday
     
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    Look forward to seeing your tree. It'll give me an idea of what to expect as the trees I saw were also from Monrovia and had the trifoliate rootstock. Climate is not an issue for me as I grow my trees indoors year-round. (My problem is not having enough space to grow them in.)

    The supply of trees here is limited relative to what is available in the States but the availability and selection is not too bad for the more common varieties. Much of it is sourced from south of the border so shortages come about as a result of events that took place down there. (e.g. quarantines, hard freezes).
     
  5. stonegarden

    stonegarden Member

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    nice to hear you have an indoor garden. solves the problem of the hard frosts and snow. sounds great! GL HF
     

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  6. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    Your tree has a nice form. Other than removing the lower branches to establish the clear trunk, did you have to do any formative pruning over the years?
     
  7. stonegarden

    stonegarden Member

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    no, just alot of minor pruning around the top and sides to achieve a sphere shape. Its first year with me I did bend the main branch down almost 90 degrees using a rock weight. This may have helped to get it to its present form, meaning: you may have to encourage a few of the main branches to grow more horizontally to get a fuller look.
     
  8. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    Thanks for the feedback, stonegarden.
     

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