Bumblebees speed up flowering by piercing plants

Discussion in 'Plants: In the News' started by Junglekeeper, May 23, 2020.

  1. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    OK, how did they learn to do that? Or are they just being peevish, intending to damage and punish the plants that aren't delivering the goods?
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Insects and flowering plants have evolved together, sharing a long history

    It will have been natural selection, wherein bees that randomly happened to bite the food source plants had greater success than those that didn't. So that over a long period of time this behavior become predominant in the population. Because of the more successful bees coming to make up the majority or all of the population.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2020
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  4. scilover

    scilover New Member

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    It really shows how important how bees to nature. But I heard there are speculations that bees could go extinct? I wonder how nature will be without bees....
     
  5. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    I had written in another thread of how I got the impression that the presence of bees had greatly increased this year. In fact, I had noticed in late spring that in the back of the house, kept in a natural garden, there was an expanse of white and yellow daisies and that it seemed that each flower had its bee intent on "shopping".

    Well, I wasn't wrong; this year, despite the Psilla and the Tignola that hit them even if in a mild form and soon returned, my trees had a production of figs never seen. Many of those in July we ate and gave away and now the field is free for insects. And I had never seen many of them too.

    Take a look:
    Fico 7 (2).jpg Fico 5 (2).jpg

    Fico 4 (2).jpg Fico 3 (2).jpg
    Fico 2.jpg

    Consider that the trees are still quite loaded and, of July figs, I've got three!!!!
    Now I wait to see what will happen with those of September.

    Needless to say, I am happy that the bees are returning in large numbers and I wonder if, even if only minimally, the lockdown period contributed with the absence of traffic and part of the productive activities.
    However, anyone wishing to come and pick some figs, the gate is open ..... if it suits you !!!

    I have a sore finger because the day before yesterday while I was picking a fruit I didn't realize that there was a little bee playing hide and seek and I put my hand on it !!

    I managed to remove the stinger but, although knowing that it was not to be removed with the tweezers, since at the time I was quite worried (since previously sensitized among bees, wasps and hornets, with whom I had several painful encounters) I did so and and remained inside the poison bag that continued to inoculate poison.

    I don’t tell you the pain! But I feel more sorry for the bee because, as the bees leave the sting inside the wound, and with it also the last segments of the abdomen and a part of the viscera, so mutilated, these insects are generally destined to die.
     
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  6. Acerholic

    Acerholic Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society

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    @Arlette, brilliant posting Arlette. Now I know where all the bees are !!!
     
  7. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    @Acerholic
    Good afternoon! (By the way what time is it from you ??)
    I am very happy for bees !!! Of course I would be more if they didn't stick to my fingers but ............. you can't have everything!
     
  8. Acerholic

    Acerholic Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society

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    @Arlette, good afternoon to you also, as I type its 1335 hrs. Do hope your hand is OK, Bee stings are nasty. I use vinegar btw, It always helps. Carried it always in my career.
     
  9. Arlette

    Arlette Active Member

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    For my background I had to use Cortisone.
    As you can see the bees are everywhere !!!!! nido vese (2).jpg
     
  10. Acerholic

    Acerholic Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society

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    @Arlette, that sounds nasty, Anaphylactic shock is not something to take lightly, glad you have cortizone ready. Do take care Arlette.
     

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