Bubble Wrap insulation

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by madhatter, Aug 23, 2008.

  1. madhatter

    madhatter Active Member

    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford BC Canada
    Amyone heard of and tried bubble wrap as an insulator for plants and their pots outside in the winter? Those advocating bubble wrap be used: are they talking about wrapping the pot on the outside as well as lining the pot on the inside with bubble wrap?
    Thanks
     
  2. Wolvie150

    Wolvie150 Active Member

    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    Based on thermodynamic properties, I think that would work. Trapped air will loose heat a lot slower than moving air.
    Inside vs outside? The colder your area, the more likely you would need to do both. Areas that just get a little cool - not (or not often) below 32* F - I would guess, my first time, just a wrap or two around the pot - like a 'verticle mulching' instead of on the ground.
    If you're going to do both, make sure the plastic is clean of any possible production oils, as well as washed, rinsed and dried from 91% isopropyl for insects/virus/disease/mold. Also check with any chems you use for the active ingredients and check vs. the type of plastic for any possible adverse reactions. (I doubt there are different 'types' of bubble wrap, but just in case.)
    If you do this, please let us know - it would be nice to see a no plastic, outside, inside and out/in study on clay pots.
    Good luck!
     
  3. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,780
    Likes Received:
    204
    Location:
    PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND.UK
  4. madhatter

    madhatter Active Member

    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Abbotsford BC Canada
    Thanks. Do you know if it is used inside pots?
    Regards
     
  5. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancashire , England
  6. Dana C

    Dana C Member

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    I would not trust bubble wrap to last very long inside a pot and suspect outside it would degrade fairly quickly. I do know many people who line the inside of their pots with styrofoam. I prefer a more natural approach. I would be very hesitant to wrap plants in plastic as it will trap moisture, as well turn into a solar oven should the sun appear.

    If your pots are on the ground, they will receive heat from below. I jam my pots all together, fill the gaps with leaves that won't compress (i.e. oak) and cover the surface with layers of fir boughs. In cold dry stretches, I cover the plants with the brown kraft paper bags you get at hardware stores for leaf litter.

    I also use fir boughs around the main stems and buds of borderline-hardy plants, tied in with string. Placing pots under trees also slows heat loss.

    Pots on a deck will not receive any heat from below and will approach the ambient temperature no matter how they are insulated. Again, you can jam them against a wall and fill around the plants with boughs.
     
  7. rinomanfroni

    rinomanfroni Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Arlington, Texas, United States
    I live in an apartment on the third floor in Dallas (it gets below 32 degrees about 15 days in a whole given year) and I have some herbaceous perennials such as Painted Daisy, Chrysanthemums, Wild Flax, Evening Primrose, Helenium, Echinacea, California Poppy, Harebell, and many others which let their areal part die off during winter and sprout up from the ground in the Spring.

    Should I wrap my pots with bubble wraps completely? I mean, not only the side, but also the top and the bottom of the pots?

    Rino
     
  8. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancashire , England
    Completely encase the plants and leave them alone till spring.

    I suggest fleece though because fleece allowes the flow of air and rain to water.
    I brought two Fuchias through the winter using fleece...so I have an head start.
     
  9. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancashire , England
    Yes luddite..great for lining the greenhouse and possibly cold frames.
     
  10. jimhardy

    jimhardy Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    fairfield iowa u.s.a.
    I would suggest wrapping your plants in burlap first,this will keep the plants from boiling in sunlight and help wick moisture away from the surface of the plant so it does not get moldy,you should leave the top so you can open it when it's mild so your plant can get some fresh air occasionally,also if possible its better to sink the pots in the ground if you can as the soil will keep the roots from freezing on cold days-
     

Share This Page