Broadleaf Evergreen Shrub ID Request

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by SusieS, Feb 8, 2021.

  1. SusieS

    SusieS Active Member

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    Photo taken on February 7th 2021 in Vancouver, BC. The close up photo shows the leaves, which are lightly serrated. The other photo shows the mystery plant growing against the fence, it is the one under the Pieris. It is 6 feet tall and almost 6 feet wide. Would like to find out the name.
     

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  2. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Hi @SusieS, you mention a 'close-up photo' but I don't see one. For me anyway, the other photo is too hard to identify.
     
  3. SusieS

    SusieS Active Member

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    Thanks Margot, I will see where that second photo went!
     
  4. SusieS

    SusieS Active Member

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    Hello again Margot. I believe the close up photo is now viewable.:)

    Thanks again for letting me know.
     
  5. hortiphoto

    hortiphoto Active Member 10 Years

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    It looks to be an abelia, probably one of the Abelia grandflora cultivars, which are now classified as Linnaea grandiflora.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Much of the appeal of these particular shrubs is the arching habit which has been eliminated in this instance by the history of the planting being sheared into a rectangular shape. Producing a formalizing of its appearance which is out of context with the setting. A setting including the vaguely Japanese treatment given the Pieris immediately behind.
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    That last is disputed by many botanists; although they are fairly close relatives in the subfamily Linnaeoideae, there is no imperative of monophyly to merge the genera. See e.g. Wang et al 2015, and Catalogue of Life.
     

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