broadleaf evergreen leaf id?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by tlpenner, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. tlpenner

    tlpenner Active Member

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    Ok--thought I'd get this myself, but cannot seem to find it...can anyone help with ID?


    Broad leaf evergreen shrub (specimen in questions is about 7-8' tall at 10 years age), hardy to zone 7.
    Leaf arrangement is alternate; leaf looks SO MUCH like a camelia, dark glossy green on top, but SILVER underside, and no sign of flower buds to be found.

    Apparently flowers are very small -almost inconspicuous, scented and produced in the fall.

    Any clues suggestions? Thanks kindly. We do have myriad broad-leafed evergreens in the pacific northwest!
     

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  2. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Autumn Olive I believe. Elaeagnus umbellata var. parvifolia

    HTH
    Chris
     
  3. tlpenner

    tlpenner Active Member

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    Thanks for your help, saltcedar.

    I think the genus is right on, but since it is evergreen and blooms are present in fall, more likely either E.pungens 'Simonii' or E.x ebbingii?
     
  4. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Dunno, I think we may have two (or more?) species masquerading
    under the same name. I see listing for deciduous and evergreen,
    Spring flowering and Autumn flowering for E. umbellata!

    Update: It seems to be semi-evergreen in parts of it's range
    and can bloom from mid-Spring to mid-Summer.

    HTH
    Chris
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2007
  5. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Neolitsea sericea ?
     
  6. tlpenner

    tlpenner Active Member

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    Alas, I checked into the Neolitsea and it is a zone 9 plant, so not likely to have survived 6 winters here in zone 7B, and the clincher is that the leaves are described as highly aromatic, whereas my sample has no scent.

    The leaf does certainly look like the laurel family on the surface though...
     
  7. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Yes , have only seen Neolitsea sericea grown here the once, at least 10-12 years ago. It had survived some cold winters {-14 C} with the easterly winds though. Don't know if it is still surviving. It was an attractive plant, but likely rarely grown here.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Elaeagnus. Notice the scales.
     
  9. TonyR

    TonyR Active Member

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    And its vein pattern is quite unlike Neolitsea's.
     
  10. tlpenner

    tlpenner Active Member

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    Thanks everyone, we will proceed with the eleagnus id. Shall I assume it's a cultivar of E. pungens, with growth potential in the 10-12' height and spread?

    How do they take to pruning?
     

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