Botanical Name for Calamondin

Discussion in 'Plants: Nomenclature and Taxonomy' started by Junglekeeper, May 8, 2004.

  1. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    What is the current botanical name for the Calamondin? Is it 'x Citrofortunella mitis', 'x Citrofortunella microcarpa', or something else?

    Is there an online database where one could look up a plant to determine its currently accepted botanical name? TIA
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The currently accepted name by the Royal Horticultural Society is × Citrofortunella microcarpa.

    × Citrofortunella microcarpa from the RHS PlantFinder database.

    As for your other question, the answer is "not really". There is no one database that has all the answers. The trick is to know what source to use for any given question.

    In this case, I used the RHS PlantFinder database, as it is UBC's standard reference for economic plants. We also use it for ornamentals (perennials, shrubs, trees) that are cultivars of European origin and European species. For North American species and cultivars, we use different references.
     
  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Thank you (rather belatedly) for your reply.

    I thought I'd share what I found with other forum users. The International Plant Names Index has a comprehensive database. Also, there are links to other searchable databases listed in the answer to question 8 in the site's FAQ. Interestingly, the first link is that for the RHS Plantfinder which you referenced.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The International Plant Names Index is indeed an excellent database, but it's not an authoritative source for determining the currently accepted name for a plant. Rather, it's an index of all names for a plant, including those that have been discarded (for whatever reason).

    As an example, search for the Pacific coastal beach strawberry, scientifically known in the past by a number of names including Fragaria chiloensis Duchesne and Fragaria vesca Coville var. chiloensis L. but now asserted to be Potentilla chiloensis (L.) Mabb.. By only looking at the entries within IPNI, it is not possible to determine what the currently accepted name of the plant is; one has to delve into the literature and make the determination.

    The good thing about the RHS Plant Finder (at least for many groups of plants that are familiar to Europeans) is that someone has already done the review of names and made a decision as to what to follow for current nomenclature.
     
  5. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Thanks for the clarification on IPNI. If RHS is the the place to look for plants of European origin, which other 'authoritative' databases are available to cover the rest of the world? For those, like myself, who may not know the origin of a plant, we would need to search in multiple databases to get an answer.
     
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Well, generally the first references we consult at UBC for species are recent floristic works, e.g., the Flora of China or the Flora of Australia. Even those aren't foolproof, however - recent molecular work is clarifying a lot of plant systematic issues, and the nomenclature is still catching up.

    One of the references we generally use for North American species is the USDA's PLANTS database - but their nomenclature is based off of the BONAP (Biota of North America Program), so there are a few groups of plants that we generally avoid and then try to track down through the primary literature (scientific journals) or sometimes through the Flora of North America .

    As for North American cultivars, there isn't a one-stop shop. We try to rely on International Cultivar Registration Authorities as much as possible, but those typically aren't databases - it usually requires firing off an email with a specific question.

    Essentially, it comes down to addressing each plant name individually. A rose family plant in North America? Consult the latest literature. A traditional European medicinal herb? Consult the PlantFinder. A Japanese cultivar of Hydrangea? Go to one of the excellent books on Hydrangeas. A Hebe cultivar? Check the published Hebe registered cultivars list from its ICRA. A BC plant? Check the Illustrated Flora of British Columbia, but also check the latest literature for some groups.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2011
  7. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Your assistance is much appreciated. I'm sure the references and hints you have provided will prove useful in future searches. Thanks, again.
     
  8. Citrus aurantifolia and calamansi (calamondin)

    Can some body tell me whether calamansi (calamondin) is a hybrid of the species of citrus aurantifolia ?
     
  9. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    I believe the calamondin is a hybrid between the mandarin (Citrus reticulata) and the kumquat (Fortunella).
     

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