Identification: Boletus barrowsii vs. Agaricus sect Xanthodematei

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by allelopath, Aug 14, 2016.

  1. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    This is Boletus barrowsii, correct?

    Northern New Mexico, USA
    2437m (7995 ft) asl
    Ponderosa pine forest.
     

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    Last edited: Aug 11, 2022
  2. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Sure looks like it, but I have not had the pleasure of meeting this species yet in person, so I'm not the best person to ask.

    Any B. barrowsii fans willing to weigh in?

    cheers,
    frog
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    This is only the 2nd time I've found what I think is B. barrowsii. This time in my backyard, right next to the aforementioned C. micaceus. Mushrooms of Colorado (Evenson) shows only 2 species of Boletus, barrowsii and edulis. This first time (as described above) I found it within Ponderosa pine at 2437m (7995ft) asl which fits the species account. My yard, however, is in a riparian area with no Ponderosa close by at 2120m (6955ft), by far the lowest I've seen a Boletus. North American Boletes (Bessette/Roody/Bessette) says its found "under ponderosa pine, fir, spruce, and live oak". The closest trees to the specimens I found this 2nd time are three Quercus gamelii, which is called Gambel oak or Scrub oak here. The book does not specify the scientific name for live oak, so not sure what to think about that. You can see that this specimen does not stain blue when cut so its not B. satanas. I'd really like to try to eat this one, so I'm trying to rule out all other possibilities.
     

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  4. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi @allelopath

    This is an Agaricus, a gilled mushroom rather than a bolete, and the bright yellow staining at the base suggests one of the non-edible species in sect Xanthodermatei. Some yellow stainers in this genus are edible, but intense yellow of this sort usually means not. Can you report back on the odour.

    And thank you for the detailed notes and photos, I always appreciate the work you put into your observations & posts.

    Onward/upward :-)
    frog
     
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  5. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Attached is a better photo. Had I seen the gills and the skirt, I would have known it wasn't Boletus. Thanks for your sharp eye. One of the lessons I've learned here is to look at both young and mature specimens.

    On your suggestion, I put my nose to it, and a faint mustard smell came to me. Then reading about A. Xanthodermatei, it is said to have a faint phenol odor. Upon further investigation mustard has phenol in it. So cool. And the yellow is apparently from the degradation/oxidation of phenol. The edibility/toxicity of this species generally reads as "it won't kill you but will make you wish it would".

    >>thank you for the detailed notes and photos,
    Being a high-functioning autistic has it advantages :)
     

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  6. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    @wcutler:
    Could you please change the title of this thread to something like "Boletus barrowsii vs Agaricus Xanthodermatei"?
     
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  7. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Done :-)
     
  8. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    And thank you for adding the follow up info & link, and additional shot.

    Interesting re mustard and phenol! To me these sorts smell like bandaids, sometimes faintly, or sometimes a loud crowd of scary bandaids :-)
     
  9. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    @Frog: I didn't realize you had superpowers. Good to know.

    And on the subject and band-aids and phenols, I guess its a beer thing
     
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  10. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    A comparison of dried slices of species.
    (Don't have B. barrowsii, so used B. edulis)
     

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