Identification: bolete?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by zeroone, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. zeroone

    zeroone Member

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    I found these under spruce trees. They were both growing on the ground alone, spore print is olive, no color change when cut and the bigger one's cap is 10.5 cm.

    It passes the tests I've read for edibility, but any guesses as to which bolete it is?
     

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  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    The seem to have a Boletus edulis (or very closely related species). You can tell because of the white reticulations on the top of the stem near the cap.
     
  3. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi Zeroone,

    I think MycoRob is right, but I'm curious about what you're referring to with
    .

    The usual rule of thumb, in my region, for boletes, is to avoid bitter-tasting or red-pored boletes. But there aren't any tests for edibility for mushrooms as such, eg. deadly amanitas taste great, silver spoons speak no truths, and so forth. I have mycofriends who disagree, since they are still alive and use the edibility tests/rules they were taught "in the old country," but I'm still thinking they're alive because most mushrooms are not poisonous, or at least not very, and because psychology also affects how we react to foods.
    .... Sometimes I just don't ask what is in the dishes at the Survivor's Banquet, because I might be better off not knowing ...

    whee! :-)
    frog
     
  4. zeroone

    zeroone Member

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    Frog,

    Sorry, I could have been more clear. I meant it as "it passes the simple bolete tests I've read for edibility" (doesn't have red pores / bitter taste / turn blue when cut / brown reticulations/ ring). No way do I believe that there are a few tests that rule out all poisonous mushrooms.


    MycoRob / Frog,

    Thanks for the responses. These are the first boletes I've picked and I appreciate your input.
     
  5. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Where in NY are you zeroone? There are several mushroom groups in NY. Two in the 'southern tier', of course a couple in The City, and a couple others sporadically spread throughout the state.
     
  6. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Gotcha Zeroone - and sorry didn't mean to pounce on you. I've just been finding it an interesting topic lately, various folks' ID/edible rules.
    cheers
    frog
     
  7. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Not to be contrary, but these specimens don't have the wide spread out base that I usually associate with B. edulis.
     
  8. Kuhnayjun

    Kuhnayjun Active Member

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    What exactly does the "turn blue when cut" indicate?
     
  9. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    BTW: In my region, one of my favourite edible boletes turns blue when cut
    :-)
    frog
     
  10. Kuhnayjun

    Kuhnayjun Active Member

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    And that favourite Bolete would be?
     
  11. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Zeller's :-)
     
  12. Kuhnayjun

    Kuhnayjun Active Member

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    Still hoping to get an answer here ....


    Does the fact that a Bolete turns blue when it is cut indicate that it should not be eaten?

    It would seem this is not a hard and fast rule. The reason I ask is that last year I collected a large number of Bolete's that were identified as Boletus Lakei but they turned blue on the stems when they were cut. I did not eat any as I was unsure of the identification given there was no mention of this characteristic when I finally found a description of Boletus Lakei.
     
  13. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi Kuhnayjun,

    I have eaten Zeller's Bolete, and they usually turn blue when cut/bruised.

    I've eated Suillus lakei, which may formerly have been called Boletus lakei, I don't recall whether they blued or not.
     
  14. zeroone

    zeroone Member

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    MycoRob,

    I'm in Syracuse. I've just searched and found there indeed is a mycological society here - interesting.


    Kuhnayjun,

    I got the 'avoid boletes that turn blue' rule/guideline from 'Common Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms of New York' where the author states that 'several poisonous boletes ... have yellow flesh that rapidly stains blue when cut or bruised'.

    Also, read "The BLUE-STAINING BOLETES" on http://americanmushrooms.com/coolest.htm

    So it seems there are both edible and poisonous boletes that stain blue, and some recommend avoiding them all, at least in my region.
     
  15. Kuhnayjun

    Kuhnayjun Active Member

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    Damn I feel a lot smarter now. Thanks to both of you!! When I collect some of the "blue stainers" again this year I will post photos to get a better ID.
     

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