Bloodgood: Scorch or Verticillium?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by veeshan, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. veeshan

    veeshan Member

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    In early March of this year, I bought a Japanese Red Maple Bloodgood and planted it in our small garden. It was growing nicely for several months from having no leaves to being full of beautiful red leaves. Then a little over a month ago when the weather started to get warmer, the leaves started to burn from the outer edge inwards.

    Now I thought it was just scorch and the tree needed more water. The calla lillies and other flowers around the tree are growing just fine and flowering nicely. The tree gets about 6 hours of full sunlight. I am located in Brooklyn, New York.

    I know it takes a new tree about a year to fully adapt to it's new surroundings. I clipped off the burned leaves 2 weeks ago and but the other leaves on the tree continued to burn. The tree is only about 3 and half feet tall at this point and the fast draining soil is covered with mulch. I water the plants and tree two times a week.

    Could anyone looking at the photos tell if this is just scorch from the sun or Verticillium? These photos were taken before watering yesterday.
     

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  2. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    No reason to suspect verticillium IMHO. I think you need to keep the soil moister during this first year, perhaps next year too. Looks like standard getting established blues to me. Also if the sun is during the afternoon it might be a lot, and we're not even in the dog days yet... ;)

    Good luck,

    -E
     
  3. CSL

    CSL Active Member

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    I have a AP 'Tamukeyama' that was damaged due to a late frost - it looks exactly like your photo right now.

    Cheers,
    CSL
     
  4. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    no verticillum problem!is normal for young maples in first season of life a, little leaves damage in october(in Italy) a new leaves sprout !
     
  5. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    A few quick notes on this tree. The Maple may have
    been sold to you as being a Bloodgood but it is not
    a Bloodgood Maple. Common for many atropurpureum
    group reds this time of year in warm direct sun is to
    see some leaf tip scorch on the terminal branch tips
    and tops of the trees usually due to lack of water in
    some fashion. It is true that wind burn scorch and
    salt burn scorch can be guesstimated in some areas
    but most of the time the leaf tip burn is more so due
    to direct sun and heat related injury due lack of water
    flowing efficiently to the terminal tips of the trees.

    Another cause of leaf tip burn is due to external Tight
    Bark and in some areas leaf tip burn can be directly
    associated with internal Pseudomonas syringae. Your
    tree near the base does show bacterial infection in the
    tree as denoted by the dark to black colored blotch
    areas in the lower portions of the trunk. There is little
    you can do about this other than try to keep your tree
    growing vigorously. As in time the bacterial infection,
    along with Verticillium branch wilt already in the tree
    can eventually kill it relatively soon after the tree loses
    vigor and stagnates in its top growth and subsequent
    reduction in root shoot development. The bacterial
    caused leaf tip scorching has been a real problem
    this year with several juvenile aged container trees
    I've run across recently, regardless as to whether
    they were nursery grown grafted individuals, came
    about from rooted cuttings or were seedlings.

    Considering the signs of a bacterium I see present
    in your tree, you were wise to have this tree planted
    in the ground. As a container tree with the same
    sun exposure, your situation could be much worse
    for you and this tree. I have a similar event going on
    with a containerized juvenile aged seedling tree of
    mine in which I expect some leaf tip burn during this
    time of year from this atropurpureum group red but
    I also expect this tree to yield new buds, after the
    damaged leaves fall off the tree, along the twig or
    branch near where the terminal tip leaves had been
    badly scorched and have since fallen.

    Tight Bark will prevent the new buds from forming
    near the scorched areas and if this happens then
    a pruning back to unaffected growth (branches
    showing no leaf tip scorch) may be necessary to
    help suppress further limb dieback. Last evening
    I pruned several juvenile aged to adult Maples just
    for this reason. Limit the spread of the tip and
    branch dieback and force the tree to send out new
    vegetative growth buds near where I pruned the trees
    back to. I may have lost the shapes of some trees
    but at the same time I helped prevent further damage
    to them. Yes, your tree also shows some incidence
    of Tight Bark as well, is not widespread in the tree yet
    which is a great sign that you may have your tree longer
    than some of us have had ours with the same condition.
    This is one area whereby growing the tree in ground in
    a cooler climate than ours helps perpetuate longer
    viability to the tree. Tight Bark and Pseudomonas
    syringae
    infection do not become nearly so expansive
    throughout the tree as fast as they can do here, as
    we have to endure more direct sun, heat, hot wind
    and soil pH related stress issues than a cooler climate
    does.

    Jim
     
  6. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    many thanks Jim every your post is more interesting!
     
  7. Skip Tyson

    Skip Tyson New Member

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    This looks like a Manyo No Sato. Not a Bloodgood.
     
  8. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples Generous Contributor Maple Society

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    Hi @Skip Tyson. 'Manyo No Sato' has total diff characteristics than the tree pictured above. Leaf shape, colors, and growth habit are not the same.
     
  9. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Totally agree D.
     
  10. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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  11. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples Generous Contributor Maple Society

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    Acerholic likes this.
  12. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Thankyou D, one of my wife's favourites.
     
  13. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples Generous Contributor Maple Society

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    I can see why. What's the fall colors?
     
  14. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Have a small photo I took after a downpour in late October 2019 looking a bit sorry for itself, but still lovely reds. Hope you like it D.
     

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  15. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples Generous Contributor Maple Society

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    Nice
     
  16. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Thanks D, better photos this Autumn ( Fall) hopefully. I'm sure the other thread will be 'very' busy with masses of colour then!!?
     
  17. vbx

    vbx Active Member

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    Silica additives helped my maples from scorching in the hot sun / dry winds.

    It also thicken the trunk of the trees pretty quick!

    I use dyna gro protekt.
     
  18. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Good morning @vbx, this is an interesting post, not heard of doing this for maples in the UK. Orchids yes but not maples. Do you have any photos of before and after ?
     
  19. vbx

    vbx Active Member

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    Hey Acerholic,

    Sorry no photos but my bloodgood out in the front yard had survived the summer last year (2019). Before the Silica treatment, the previous 2 years, the maple would all have dead leaves by July/Aug. Tree would look dead. And no new flush of growth since I was too lazy to pluck out all the dead leaves.

    in 2019, the bloodgood made it all the way through the fall / early winter w/o scorching / dropping all it leaves.
     
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  20. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    Hi vbx, that is impressive, please do update or create a new thread on the use of Silica. A lot of people will want to know the benefits.
     
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