Blackberries

Discussion in 'Fruit and Vegetable Gardening' started by SandraJo, May 17, 2005.

  1. SandraJo

    SandraJo Member

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    Location:
    Ft.St.John BC
    I live northern BC and wanted to know when and where would be the best place to plant blackberries
     
  2. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Maryland USA zone 7
    Hi Sandra,

    Looks like the last frost date for Dawson's Creek is June5th.
    http://www.almanac.com/garden/frostcanada.php

    This site is from Illinois in the US which has hardiness zones 4 to 6. You appear to be in hardiness zone 2 so they may not survive your winters.
    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/fruit/blackberries.html
    Canadian hardiness zones map


    You'll need to find a sunny sheltered spot.
    http://berrygrape.oregonstate.edu/fruitgrowing/berrycrops/blackberry.htm
    http://muextension.missouri.edu/explore/agguides/hort/g06000.htm

    Newt
     
  3. nick

    nick Member

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    Location:
    Merville V.I.
    My experience with blackberries: thornless (Loch Ness) is productive but tasteless. Use braced posts and install support wires at 4 ' and 7'. Get Himalayan plants (not the plants with deeply incised leaves) in the off season. Feed lots of compost and water heavily in the heat of summer. Never allow water on the fruit if possible.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    It should be noted that nick's advice above is region-specific. Planting what is commonly known as the Himalayan blackberry (often cited as Rubus discolor but actually Rubus armeniacus) in areas where it is hardy and conditions are right (such as the Lower Mainland of British Columbia) can contribute to plant invasiveness: BC Biodiversity - Noxious Weeds. On the other hand, it shouldn't be a problem in Fort St. John as it is doubtful it would survive the winters without human intervention.
     

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